31 July 2018

• The Importance of Bunker


“When the calendar flipped to July, excited whispers filtered in from fishermen and through our community’s vast network of tackle shop counters, online reports and social media posts...

“To an outsider, the excitement over a 1-pound fish that won’t hit a baited hook or lure and is too oily for table fare is difficult to understand, but the appeal of the pogy, or menhaden, is not as food for humans, it’s as a preferred prey item for big striped bass....”

Please visit this link to read the full article: BostonHerald

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

30 July 2018

• Warmer Waters = More Black Sea Bass


“Scientists tell us that some fish will be winners and others losers as oceans warm…

“In Rhode Island, count lobster, silver hake and winter flounder among the losers, their numbers plummeting as climate change drives water temperatures higher. On the list of winners so far are squid, summer flounder, butterfish. And black sea bass….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: ProvidenceJournal

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

29 July 2018

• Sharks and Long Island


“Scientists have identified 26 different species of shark in New York waters, but about a half dozen of those species are most commonly seen around Long Island…

“Adult sharks also pass through New York waters as they migrate to follow food. In 2016, a great white shark nicknamed Mary Lee built a large following on social media as she swam south of the Hamptons….”


Please visit this link to read the full article: Newsday

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

28 July 2018

• “These Days, Long Island Lobstermen Catch Everything But Lobster”


“John German hunted the delectable red crustacean for five decades. But as he motored his 40-foot boat, the Suzanne Marie, out of Mount Sinai Harbor at dawn Wednesday, he wasn't looking for lobster. He was fishing for conch, a spiral-shelled mollusk beloved in Asia…

“The lobsters are nearly gone—and with them, the $100 million a year that they brought to Long Island. During lobstering's heyday, in the '80s and '90s, German operated two boats with a dozen workers who set 5,000 traps. His son captained one boat and his two girls helped out in the summer.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: Newsday

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

27 July 2018

• CT DEEP Marine Fishing Report – 26 July 2018


STRIPED BASS fishing is good with the approaching “thunder” full moon, especially at night and during the weekday when there is less boat traffic. The bass have set up on reefs, in typical fashion for this time of the year. Dawn and dusk is prime time for large stripers on the reefs, rip areas and lower coastal tidal rivers. Live lining eels, bunker or hickory shad has been the ticket to land a “cow” bass.

Striper areas include the Watch Hill reefs, lower Thames River, the Race, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, outer Bartlett Reef, Black Point, Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River (Great Island), Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef (outer), Westbrook, Sixmile Reef, Falkner Island area, the reefs off Branford, New Haven Harbor (including Sandy Point), Charles Island area, lower Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Bridgeport Harbor, Penfield Reef, around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef. Night fishing is good at the DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier and Harkness Memorial Park. Dawn and dusk is prime time for large stripers on the reefs, rip areas and lower coastal tidal rivers. Live-lining eels, bunker or hickory shad has been the ticket.

PORGY [Scup] fishing is very good in Long Island Sound. Any spot with hard bottom (structure) is worth fishing on. The mouth of the Housatonic River to Charles Island and also along Morningside (Milford) is fantastic. Fishing from shore try Stratford Seawall* at high tide. Rocky Neck State Park, Harkness Memorial State Park, Meigs Point Hammonassett, Sherwood Island State Park and Fort Trumbull State Park. Locate your favorite Enhanced Shore Fishing Opportunities for these hard fighting and excellent eating “Reef Slammers." These “panfish of the sea” are easily caught on sandworms/cut squid or any other small piece of bait.

*Note that the Town of Stratford may have closed fishing at the seawall.

BLUEFISH fishing is very good and the summer bite is on. Find the birds and the countless pods of juvenile and adult menhaden found throughout the Sound and its game on. The time is now to plan a “deep sea” fishing trip with a party charter boat and fish for those “alligator” sized blues. The Race, Plum Gut, many of the major rocky reefs, rips, and shoal areas in LIS are the best bets at this time. Diamond jigs, trolling parachute jigs or umbrella rigs, and using fresh bunker or hickory shad chunks on three-way bottom rigs have all been effective.

Other bluefish spots include the Sluiceway, Gardiners Bay, Peconic Bays, and the north shore of Long Island along with the Stratford Shoal Housatonic River area. My recommendation is to hook up with a Party or Charter Boat and enjoy some of the best FISHING you will ever experience. There is no harder fighting fish in the sea. “Snappers” (juvenile bluefish) and “Harbor Blues” (16 - 22 inches) are also common along all shore locations. These under sized bluefish provide great sport for shore anglers. Try the lower reaches of tidal rivers and estuaries...you will be glad you did as these predators push the bait up rivers.

BLACK SEA BASS fishing is now steadily improving again as they feed heavily after the spawn. The Charles Island area along with Stratford Shoal (11B) has been producing. Deeper you fish the bigger the sea bass. Fish shallower and you will catch some keeper-sized sea bass along with summer flounder, a lot of sea robins and smooth dogfish (aka sandsharks). CT black sea bass regulations are as follows...15 inch min. length, 5 fish daily limit from May 19th to December 31st. Berkely Gulp (swimming mullet), on a jig along with squid with a spinner works great for these “Bucketmouths." Clams and sandworms also work well.

FLUKE [Summer Flounder] no report.

STRIPED SEA ROBIN fishing is amazingly very good throughout LIS for this “hardhead fish with spines and large pectoral fins”. There is no shortage of robins as boat or shore anglers are enjoying some family fishing fun. These beautiful and strange looking fish are now very common especially when bottom fishing at many of Connecticut’s shore fishing sites. With many fish measuring over 20 inches, 3 pounds and “barking up a storm” (grunting noise they make when handling them). They love sandworms, squid and any live or dead bait. They are also very good to eat. Please be careful when handling them...be mindful of their spines located on top of their head and gill cover.

WHITE PERCH fishing remains good for those dedicated and patient anglers. Spend some time relaxing in any coastal estuary with a little piece of bait (shrimp/sandworm) on a small hook, enjoying some jumbo white perch on the flood tide. Wow, they are good eating. Perch are found in shallow water at any estuary, tidal river and cove along Connecticut’s shoreline. Productive spots include the Pawcatuck River (Stanton Weir Pit/Point), Mystic River, upper Thames River and Niantic River, lower Connecticut River (DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier), Black Hall River, Lieutenant River, North/South Cove and Hamburg Cove. Grass Shrimp and or a small piece of sandworm fished on the bottom are the keys to success.

HICKORY SHAD fishing is good once again. They are back as one angler remarked. Try the Black Hall River, Lieutenant and Branford River, lower Connecticut River by the DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier and in Clinton Harbor. Flood or the beginning of the ebb tide is typically the best time and lure choices are a willow leaf (silver or copper), kastmaster (single hook), small plastic jigs (white, red or chartreuse), and or shad darts in various colors. You will be impressed with these “high flyers.”

BLACKFISH (TAUTOG) fishing has slowed as the water temps get above 72F and they are spawning. However, shore anglers continue to score on large “taug.” Find a rock pile or piling close to casting distance and hang on. The daily creel limit is 2 fish per person and the minimum size is 16 inches. Tautog love eating crabs...try green, Asian and hermit crabs for bait. Look for tautog in shallow water as they finish spawning over shellfish beds, pilings with mussel beds and rock (reef) piles (8 to 30 ft).

BLUE CRAB fishing is good. Crabs are done with the first shed and are continuing to mate. With some patience...you can catch a lot of blue crabs of all sizes. Please remember it’s mating season for the crabs and release all egg-bearing females (sooks or lemon bellies). Crabbers note that if you release the female...more males will venture into the area and improve your overall crab catches. There are some large “jimmies” (male crabs) being captured (8.5/8” spike to spike) along with some impressive sooks (females up to 7.25 inches carapace width). Remember...all egg bearing females must be released without avoidable injury. Minimum carapace length is 5 inches for a hard shell crab.

Blue crab fishermen please release all diamondback terrapins’ caught in your traps. The turtles must be released without injury or unavoidable harm. These turtles are also feeding and laying eggs along CT’s coast. Legal gear types include: scoop (dip) net, hand line, star crab trap, circular (topless) trap not exceeding 26 inches in diameter. Maryland Style Crab traps are prohibited. Chicken with the skin on it (along with a long handle net) and a small circular crab trap is the preferred method to capture these tasty crabs.

WEAKFISH fishing has surprised many anglers...good catches of “squeteague” are occurring while anglers bottom fish for fluke and sea bass. Good fishing in Niantic (Black Point), New Haven Harbor by the breakwaters over to Woodmont/Milford Point and along Stratford shoals to Darien. One of the best eating saltwater fish you will ever catch and it’s also the state fish of Delaware.
Read the full report at this link: Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

26 July 2018

• Eat Fish…Live Longer!


“A 16-year study, which dove into the data of almost half a million men and women, concludes that a diet rich in fish predicts a longer life…

“Consuming fish has long been recommended as part of a nutritious diet. Rich in high-quality proteins, vitamins, and healthful oils, fish is roundly considered a healthful choice.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: MedicalNewsToday

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

23 July 2018

• Fish Like Charles Island Oyster Breeding Cages


“As oyster farming has evolved to using stacked cages to grow more of the shellfish on the same area of seabed, researchers are wondering how fish are responding to the artificial structures…

“So far, it seems the fish like the oysters’ breeding cages just fine.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: NewHavenRegister



File photo from NOAA; see the article for related pix

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

22 July 2018

• Lure Designers Who Have Made An Impact


“A sense of self-satisfaction goes with enjoying something you’ve created. Experiencing this feeling can have a lifelong impact…

“When you speak with those lucky few who have built careers on building lures, you discover that this sense of satisfaction is only one of the rewards to be reaped—you also get to saunter down to the jetties, beaches and docks a bit more regularly than those with more-traditional jobs.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: SportFishingMag

Lure photo from: KitteryTradingPost

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

21 July 2018

• Stratford Bans Fishing from Seawall


“The town has banned fishing off the sea wall on Beach Drive, police announced Friday...

“The ban is part of an existing town ordinance that prohibits fishing in any recreational area, except places designated by the town to allow it.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: CTPOST.com
Map is from Google Maps

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

20 July 2018

• CT DEEP Marine Fishing Report – 19 July 2018


STRIPED BASS fishing remains solid with many schoolie bass being caught close inshore, and some large bass (40” +) being caught in the CT river and out in deeper water on rips and structure near the Race and Plum Gut.

The ticket for landing some of these large bass seems to be live bait such as eels or bunker, and working structure with bucktail jigs with some sort of gulp or tail on it to give it some live action. The best striper fishing has been occurring at both the early dawn and late night. Plenty of schoolie bass have been caught from shore and they consistently smash soft plastic lures in skinny water. When targeting large striped bass be sure to fish good structure such as reefs and lower coastal tidal rivers with live bait for the best results

PORGY [Scup] fishing has been incredible this past week with lots of monster scup (~15”) being caught in deeper waters with fishable structure such as rock piles, reefs, and wrecks. Some of the hot spots for scup by boat are Middleground, Six-Mile Reef, and Greens Ledge Lighthouse. Enhanced shore fishing sites such as Fort Nathan Hale, Branford Point, and Calf Pasture Beach Pier have been housing a surprisingly large amount of scup. The ticket to catching these hubcap-sized scup is using high-low rigs with squid strips, sand worms, and clams. Make sure to use small pieces of bait on your hooks when targeting scup, as they will easily strip your bait if there is too much hanging off.

BLUEFISH fishing has picked up and there are plenty of harbor blues close to shore as well as some gator-sized blues being taken amongst the schools of harbor blues. Snapper blues have moved into shallow estuaries and the mouths of tidal rivers, and snapper poppers as well as small kastmasters have proved effective. Snappers were biting at the Old Saybrook Causeway with many of them in the 4” range along with large schools of larger snappers (~10”) and harbor blues feeding on small baitfish.

BLACK SEA BASS fishing has slowed down significantly since last week especially in eastern and central LIS, with a far lower number of keepers; however the activity is expected to get better in the coming weeks. Fishing with high – low rigs with squid strips, gulp, or clams has proved to be the best way to land keeper sized sea bass. Some of the recent hot spots include Six Mile reef, Stratford Shoals, and Middleground for awesome bass action. Fishing deep structure at slack tide has produced some trophy sized black sea bass, scup, and the

FLUKE [Summer Flounder] fishing in L.I.S. remains fair but seems to be slowly picking up during the past week with some keeper-sized fluke being caught both from shore and by boat. There are plenty of short fluke being caught in the 14” range but currently keeper sized fluke 19”+ are rare. The big ones are being caught on bucktail jigs with gulp mullet, mummichogs, and fresh squid strips. Some of the hot spots for fluke fishing from shore include Cini Park in Niantic, Saybrook Point in Old Saybrook, and Branford Point in Branford. When fishing from a boat remember to get out into deeper water and jig bucktails and fluke rigs along the bottom with fresh squid or gulp while drifting. When targeting fluke from shore remember that enhanced shore fishing sites allow you to harvest smaller fluke (minimum 17”) which gives anglers a better shot at hooking into a fish that is legal size to keep, so be sure to be on the lookout for these enhanced sites to take advantage of the opportunity!

STRIPED SEA ROBIN fishing is always good in Long Island sound, and there seems to be an abundance of large sea robins being caught while anglers are targeting other species such as scup, sea bass, and fluke. They are aggressive feeders and will eat just about anything you drop down, but they especially love squid, sandworms, bunker strips, and gulps

WHITE PERCH no report

MACKEREL no report.

BLACKFISH (TAUTOG) fishing remains slow as anglers try to target these delicious fish with green, Asian, and hermit crabs amongst the rock walls and jetties. The minimum size to keep tog is 16” with a daily creel limit of 2 per angler.

BLUE CRAB are becoming more prevalent in tidal rivers as the water warms up, and we can expect to see plenty keeper sized crabs (5” tip to tip) by the end of July. These crabs are super fun to catch with a hand lineand a scoop net, and is a great activity to get the whole family out on the water. Catching and harvesting blue crabs does not require a fishing license, but remember that egg-bearing females must be released back into the water as it is mating season for the blue crabs. Soft shell crabs that are in the molting process can be kept at a length of 3.5” tip to tip. Blue crab season is open until November 30th, so there will be plenty of opportunities to fill your freezers with some good eating crabs, especially when the water warms up in August.

WEAKFISH no report.
Read the full report at this link: Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

19 July 2018

• Madison, CT Fishing Report


“If there ever was a season that kept fishers on their toes, this is it. Overall, fishing has been quite good. There have been sizable fish caught and some unusual ones, too. There have also been good, yet inconsistent runs, as schools of bait moved from spot to spot…

“As expected, the striped bass and black sea bass are cooperating. Scup has been red hot and large sea robins outrageous, while summer flounder needs coaxing.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: ZIP06.com

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

18 July 2018

• Big Bass Arrive At Montauk


“It took longer than expected, but large striped bass, commonly referred to as cow bass among devoted anglers, finally showed up in huge numbers…in Montauk waters...

“Fish in the 20-to-50-pound range were landed with great regularity and the bite was equally solid, whether you fished during the day or under the bright, moonlit night skies....”

Please visit this link to read the full article: EastHamptonStar

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

17 July 2018

• CT DEEP Marine Fishing Report – 12 July 2018


STRIPED BASS fishing is still good with many schoolie bass being caught close inshore, and some large bass (40” +) being caught in the CT river and out in deeper water on rips and structure near the Race and Plum Gut. The ticket for landing some of these large bass seems to be live bait such as eels or bunker, and working structure with bucktail jigs with some a gulp or tail on it to give it some live action.

The best striper fishing has been occurring at both the early dawn and late night. There have been plenty of schoolie bass caught from shore and they consistently smash soft plastic lures in skinny water. When targeting large striped bass be sure to fish good structure such as reefs (rip areas) and lower coastal tidal rivers with live bait for the best results. If you don’t have access to a boat and are fishing from shore, there has been plenty of success at some of the Enhanced Shore Fishing Sites. Specifically, Calf Pasture Beach Pier and sandbar, Seaside Park, Bond’s Dock, Silver Sands Beach, Gulf Beach Pier and Gulf Beach jetty, New Haven’s Fort Nathan Hale Pier and Sandy Point (West Haven Sandbar) and Old Saybrook Point have been productive. Please use circle hooks when fishing with bait (prevent gut hooking) and practice catch & release.

PORGY [Scup]fishing has been incredible this past week with lots of monster scup (~14”) being caught in deeper waters with fishable structure such as rock piles, reefs, and wrecks. Some of the hot spots for scup by boat are Middleground, Six-Mile Reef, and Greens Ledge Lighthouse. Enhanced shore fishing sites such as Fort Nathan Hale, Branford Point, and Calf Pasture Beach Pier have been housing a surprisingly large amount of scup. The ticket to catching these hub cap sized scup is using high-low rigs with squid strips, sand worms, and clams. Make sure to use small pieces of bait on your hooks when targeting scup as they will strip your bait easily if you leave too much hanging off. Contact your local bait and tackleshop for updated fishing information.

BLUEFISH fishing has picked up and there are plenty of harbor blues to be caught close to shore and there are some gator sized blues being taken amongst the schools of harbor blues. There have been sightings of snapper blues in shallow water estuaries and at the mouths of tidal rivers. The mouth of the Connecticut River on popper rigs and small kastmasters, will likely provide results, many of the fish are in the 4” range at this point in the season.

BLACK SEA BASS fishing has remained excellent this past week with many large fish being taken, and plenty of anglers are quickly limiting out on sea bass out in deeper water (60’-100”). Fishing with high – low rigs with squid strips, gulp, or clams has proved to be the best way to land lots of keeper sized sea bass. Sea bass ction to the East of the Connecticut River has picked significantly over the last few weeks. Some of the recent hot spots in the Central and Western sound include Six Mile reef, Stratford Shoals, and Middlegrounds. Fishing deep structure at slack tide has produced some trophy sized black sea bass, scup, and the occasional summer flounder. Remember to move from structure to structure when targeting these “sea biscuits” to find some hot action.

FLUKE [Summer Flounder] fishing in Long Island Sound remains fair at best but there has been some successful anglers during the past week with some keeper sized fluke being caught both from shore and by boat. There are plenty of short fluke being caught in the 14” range but currently keeper sized fluke 19”+ are few and far between. The big ones are being caught on bucktail jigs with gulp mullet, and fresh squid have also produced some doormats. Some of the hot spots for fluke fishing from shore include Cini Park and Mago Point on the Niantic River and Saybrook Point in Old Saybrook. When fishing from a boat remember to get out into deeper water and jig bucktails and fluke rigs along the bottom with fresh squid or gulp while drifting. When targeting fluke from shore remember that enhanced shore fishing sites allow you to harvest smaller fluke (minimum 17”) which gives anglers a better shot at hooking into a fish that is legal size to keep, so be sure to be on the lookout for these enhanced sites to take advantage of the opportunity.

STRIPED SEA ROBIN fishing is always good in Long Island sound, and there seems to be an abundance of very large sea robins being caught while anglers are targeting other species such as scup, sea bass, and fluke. They are aggressive feeders and will eat just about anything you drop down, but they especially love squid, sandworms, and bunker strips. Contrary to popular belief that they are a “trash fish” that people generally do not eat, they are actually very tasty to eat with mild, white meat in the tails and are referred to as “poor man’s lobster” by anglers who harvest these fish. Keep some of these “birds” in your cooler on your next trip and try them out, you may be surprised.

WHITE PERCH…no report

MACKEREL…no report

BLACKFISH (TAUTOG) fishing remains slow as anglers try to target these delicious fish with green, Asian, and hermit crabs amongst the rock walls and jetties. The minimum size to keep tog is 16” with a daily creel limit of 2 per angler.

BLUE CRAB are becoming more prevalent in tidal rivers as the water warms up, and we can expect to see plenty keeper sized crabs (5” tip to tip) by the end of July. These crabs are super fun to catch with a hand line and a scoop net, and is a great activity to get the whole family out on the water. Catching and harvesting blue crabs does not require a fishing license, but remember that all egg bearing females must be released without avoidable injury, and the minimum carapace length is 5 inches for a hard shell crab. Please contact your local bait and tackle shop for most updated information (local hot spots) Legal gear types include: scoop (dip) net, hand line, star crab trap, circular (topless) trap not exceeding 26 inches in diameter. Maryland Style Crab traps are prohibited.

WEAKFISH…no report
Read the full report at this link: Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

16 July 2018

• This Season’s Top Striper Lures


“There are many classic lures that have been used for years in the salt. The Danny Plug, the Polaris Popper, The Bullet, The Kastmaster spoon, the Pencil Popper and more. Every once in a while, a lure comes into play that everyone has to have because they work so well. In the past few years, three lures have made it to the top as items that you have to carry to the water...

“The Magic Swimmer by Sebile is a lure that has taken the surf community by storm. You very seldom see a surf bag without one….”



Please visit this link to read the full article: HeraldNews.com

Lure photo from: Cabelas.com

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

15 July 2018

• Road Trip: Penobscot River


“The weather forecast of rain for the next day was wrong and we had a pleasant and fruitful day, catching lots of cooperative fish. But instead of rushing to eat, this time we stopped fishing around 3 and drove back to the restaurant when it opened at 4…

“Then it was back to the river and we fished until total darkness, sometime after 9. That was when Ron landed the largest brook trout of the trip, one estimated to be around 18 inches. He caught it on a gray caddisfly in some pretty heavy current.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: BerkshireEagle

File photo

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

14 July 2018

• Fly Fishing: Striped Bass and Bluefish


“Set aside what you think you know about fly fishing. It doesn't always happen on mountain streams. There's plenty of saltwater fly fishing going on…with anglers picking up bluefish and striped bass…

”…On The Water magazine, gives us a primer on saltwater fly fishing: how to get started, and how not to be intimidated by that graceful casting manuever. …

Please visit this link to read the full article: CapeAndIslands.org

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

13 July 2018

• Popping for Bluefish on long Island Sound Flats


“In late spring, most years, bluefish move onto shallow flats around Long Island during flood tides to feed on small baitfish…

“Lots of anglers keep their focus on stripers, but to overlook the bluefish option is to miss one of the Northeast’s most exciting inshore fisheries.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: SportFishingMag.com

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

12 July 2018

• About Stripers on Light Tackle


“Using 8-weight fly rods, fast sinking fly lines and Lefty’s Deceiver flies we’d tied we took almost 100 stripers in the 16 to 28-inch range…

“The only reason we fell short of the century mark was my futile insistence on taking a striper on a fly rod popper. The fish slapped at it, played volleyball with it, jumped over it, and did everything but take it. I never hooked a striper in that hour of trying.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: BaltimoreSun

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

11 July 2018

• Where Are the Stripers?


“This spring has been weird for striped bass fishing to say the least, with many just saying the run is behind schedule and others saying the fish are simply in different places, taking different routes than they have for millennia…

“I’m not so sure if a cold spring or new migration paths are the only things wrong right now as there is no denying that the fishery is not as healthy as it should be. …”

Please visit this link to read the full article: TheFisherman

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

10 July 2018

• Charles Island Warning Sign Posted


“’Walking all the way to Charles Island is not always possible,’ the new sign advises. ‘The Department of Energy and Environmental Protection prohibits walking on any portion of the sandbar while it is covered with water…

“’Though it may look inviting, the 1.25 mile round trip walk out and back may take up to an hour — especially with children, the curiosity of shell gathering, and the unstable footing…

”’No crossing to the island is allowed May 1 through Aug. 31 when the island is managed as a Natural Area Preserve for nesting birds.…’”

Please visit this link to read the full article: MilfordMirror

A related story appears at: NBCConnecticut

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

09 July 2018

• Fish Can Warm Themselves By Sunbathing


“When land-dwelling ectothermic animals — including lizards, snakes and frogs — need to warm up, they seek out a sunny spot and soak up the sunlight. But it was long thought that cold-blooded fish and other animals that live in water were denied this extra heat because of water's cooling effect…

“Previously, scientists thought that sunbathing fish couldn't warm up to temperatures higher than those of sun-heated water. But in the new study, researchers discovered that sun-seeking carp absorbed and retained more heat than surface water did….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: LiveScience.com

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

08 July 2018

• Changes to Marine Fishing Regulations for 2018


Black Sea Bass: Details available online. General Anglers - 15 inch minimum length. Five fish per day May 19 -December 31. Party/Charter Boats - 15 inch minimum length. Five fish per day from May 19 - August 31; then 7 fish per day from September 1 - December 31.

Porgy (Scup): New - 9 inch minimum length except at Enhanced Opportunity Shoreline Locations where the minimum length is 8 inches. Daily limit remains 30 per person.

Summer Flounder (Fluke): New - the daily creel limit everywhere is 4 fish and the season has changed to May 4 - September 30. Minimum lengths remain the same as they were in 2017, 19 inches everywhere except at Enhanced Opportunity Shoreline Locations where the minimum length is 17 inches.

Blackfish (Tautog): New- 3 fish per day creel limit during October 10 to November 28. No change to the size of 16 inches for any season and no change in the daily limit for the Spring and Summer Seasons.…

Source: CTDEEP

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

07 July 2018

• Bluefish Management Changes Coming


“The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (Council) and Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (Commission) are initiating development of an amendment to the Bluefish Fishery Management Plan (FMP)…

“The amendment is to review and possibly revise the allocation between commercial and recreational fisheries, fishery management plan goals and objectives, commercial allocations among states, and commercial quota transfer process.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: TheFisherman

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

06 July 2018

• CT DEEP Marine Fishing Report – 05 July 2018


STRIPED BASS fishing remains good coming off the full moon. Striped bass fishing is on the east side is rock solid at The Race and Plum Gutin 40’ – 60’ of water. The largest bass this week have been reeled in using Bucktails as well as live-lining Atlantic menhaden (bunker) and American eels. Chumming with menhaden strips is expediting the catch. The great majority of big hits has been happening at night and early dawn .

Onthe westside Middleground, Charles Island, Stratford Shoals, Norwalk Islands, the North side of 28-C, 11-B, off Todd’sPoint, Captain’s Island and off Rye, New York’s Playland has been fantastic. Like the east side, the west sidenight bite has been most successful for CT Trophy Fish Award sized bass. From Greenwich to Stonington thereare schoolies, and those juveniles are still slamming soft plastic lures in chartreuse, pink, clear and light gray.But you don’t need a boat to catch a trophy Striper, as many of the CT Enhanced Shore Opportunity sites arecreating big smiles and tired arms.

Specifically, Calf Pasture Beach Pier and sandbar, Fayerweather Island and Seaside Park, Bond’s Dock, Silver Sands Beach, Gulf Beach Pier and Gulf Beach jetty, New Haven’s Fort Nathan Hale Pier and Sandy Point (West Haven Sandbar) have been fantastic. Not to be missed; Avery Point, Fort Trumbull State Pier, CT DEEP Marine Fisheries pier, the old Dock & Dine and Branford Point have been terrific. Dawn and dusk is prime time for large stripers on the reefs, rip areas and lower coastal tidal rivers. Live lining eels, bunker or hickory shad has been the ticket.

Please use circle hooks when fishing with bait (prevent gut hooking) and practice catch & release.

PORGY [Scup] fishing is even hotter than black sea bass this week, with limits (30) being reached rapidly. Scup are gobbling up sand worms, clams and squid on a high-low rig are your winning baits. Scup are attracted to any rock pile or wreck but the hubcap sized CT Trophy Award Program sized fish are waiting for you in deeper waters. CT’s Enhanced Opportunity Shore Fishing sites are housing A lot of scup. Calf Pasture Beach Pier, Saint Mary’s by the Sea, Pleasure Beach Family Pier, the Stratford Wall, Silver Sands State Park, Short Beach and Fort Nathan Hale’s brand new pier have proven quite rewarding.

Also, Fort Trumbull State Park, Avery Point, Branford Point, Walnut Beach, and West Haven Beach piers have been providing fishers with a beautiful dinner this week. By boat Middleground, Six-Mile Reef and Greens Ledge Lighthouse, as well as Rowayton’s Ballast Reef are hot. Back to shore, Greenwich Town Pier (pier is closed but you can catch your limit via parking lot), Cove Island and Cummings Beach Pier are excellent spots this week. Locate your favorite Enhanced Shore Fishing Opportunitiesfor these hard fighting and excellent eating 'Reef Slammers.' These 'panfish of the sea' are easily caught on sandworms/cut squid or any other small piece of bait. Contact your local bait and tackleshop for updated fishing information. Time to plan a trip on a party/charter boat in CT.

BLUEFISH fishing is very good. Bluefish (Blues) are sporadic and there are more on the western side of Long Island Sound than the east side. Look for the birds, then look for the menhaden school, then cast just outside the school and you may catch an “Alligator-sized”Bluefish. Juvenile bluefish, also known as Harbor Blues and TaylorBlues have been migrating north and are getting hooked at shore spots from Todd’s Point in Greenwich to Sandy Point Audubon Beach. Most are getting hooked with 1/2oz. to 1oz. Castmasters, on hotter DAYS at dawn. My recommendation is to hook up with a Party or Charter Boat and enjoy some of the best FISHING you will ever experience. Harbor Blues (15 - 24 inches) are also very common in lower estuaries. Snappers (juvenile bluefish) have not arrived yet!

BLACK SEA BASS fishing is on fire throughout Long Island Sound. Middleground, #23 and #24 in New York on the west side in 60’ – 100’ of water, Six-Mile Reef, Stratford Shoals Green can “C,” and Norwalk Islands are fulfilling anglers daily limit (5) in short time. Clams and squid strips tipped on a high-low rig are a necessity to catch black sea bass. Sea bass are often schooling with Scup, so if you catch one of the species, you’ll likely catch the other. Fishing over any deep water structure (gnarly bottom preferred) in 30 to 110 ft around slack tide will produce some trophy-sized “humpbacks”. Fish shallower and you will catch some keeper-sized sea bass along with fluke, sea robins and smooth dogfish (aka sand sharks). It’s important to continue to move from structure to structure to find these beautiful and awesome eating fish. Remember, CT black sea bass regulations are as follows...15 inch min. length, 5 fish daily limit from May 1st to December 31st. Berkely Gulp (swimming mullet), on a jig along with squid with a spinner works great for these 'Bucketmouths.'

FLUKE [Summer Flounder]fishing is fair in Long Island Sound. Better around Block Island Sound and off Montauk. Not everyone is hitting their daily limit, but there are some real doormats weighing in this Independence Day week. Many are over 24” and we had a 11.6 pounder weighed in this week in Waterford – AND, this big doormat was caught in shallow water. At the Middleground there are a lot of smaller brethren mixed in with some arm benders. The 13.2 pound, 32 inch fluke was also landed with a bucktail in the central sound. Jennings Beach, Cockonoe Island, Six-Mile Reef and Charles Island are good bets this week to haul in keeper fluke.

Try drifting with a white or pink Bucktail Jig and attach a Berkely 3”- 4” Gulp Mullet in chartreuse, white or pink color. Fresh squid and or silversides (spearing) have also been producing some nice fluke. Minimum size is 19 inches and the daily creel limit is 4 fish per person.

STRIPED SEA ROBIN fishing is always good in LIS for this “hardhead fish with spines and large pectoral fins”. These beautiful and strange looking fish are now very common especially when bottom fishing at many of Connecticut’s shore fishing sites. With many fish measuring over 20 inches, 3 pounds and “barking up a storm” (grunting noise they make when handling them). They love sandworms, squid and any live or dead bait. They are also very good to eat. Please be careful when handling them...be mindful of their spines located on top of their head and gill cover.

WHITE PERCH fishing remains good. Spend some time relaxing in any coastal estuary with a little piece of bait (shrimp/sandworm), enjoying some jumbo white perch. Wow, they are good eating. Perch are found in estuaries, tidal rivers and coves along the Connecticut shoreline. Productive spots include the Pawcatuck River (Stanton Weir Pit/Point), Mystic River, upper Thames River and Niantic River, lower Connecticut River (DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier), Black Hall River, Lieutenant River, North/South Cove and Hamburg Cove. Grass shrimp and or a small piece of sandworm fished on the bottom are the keys to success.

HOLY MACKEREL! The Mack Attack is on the east side of the sound, half way between Long Island and the Connecticut side. Sabiki Rigs have been excellent attracters.

HICKORY SHAD fishing is ok in the Black Hall River, Four Mile, Lieutenant and Branford River, lower Connecticut River by the DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier and in Clinton Harbor. These incredible hard fighting fish are on the move...moving up and down river systems. Connecticut Tarpon (Hickory shad) can be found mixed in with schoolie striped bass and harbor bluefish. Flood or the beginning of the ebb tide is typically the best time and lure choices are a willow leaf (silver or copper), kastmaster (single hook), small plastic jigs (white, red or chartreuse), and or shad darts in various colors. You will be impressed with these “high flyers”. It’s great shore fishing and you get to meet a lot of anglers and trade fishing stories (“secrets”).

BLACKFISH (TAUTOG) fishing season is open in Connecticut waters. The daily creel limit is 2 fish per person and the minimum size is 16 inches. Tautog love eating crabs...try green, Asian and hermit crabs for bait. Look for tautog in shallow water as they begin spawning over shellfish beds. Other prime locations include: pilings with mussel beds and rock (reef) piles (5 to 30 ft).

BLUE CRAB are in the molting phase (sally crab) and becoming more active in the tidal creeks and rivers as the water warms up. There appears to be a lot of smaller crabs out there...a good sign for a great year of crabbing. With a little time...there should be beaucoup blue crabs of legal size to catch. Please release sub-legal crabs with care. Also, please remember it’s mating season for the crabs and release all egg-bearing females (sooks or lemon bellies).

There are some large “jimmies” (male crabs) being captured (8.0 inches spike to spike) along with some impressive sooks. Remember, all egg bearing females must be released without avoidable injury, and the minimum carapace length is 5 inches for a hard shell crab. Please contact your local bait and tackle shop for most updated information (local hot spots), legal crab traps and bait to use for your fun-filled crabbing. Legal gear types include: scoop (dip) net, hand line, star crab trap, circular (topless) trap not exceeding 26 inches in diameter. Maryland Style Crab traps are prohibited. Chicken with the skin on it (along with a long handle net) and a small circular crab trap is the preferred method to capture these tasty crabs.

WEAKFISH fishing is good with 20-34 inch size fish being caught in the east and central sound. Westernsound catches are improving as the population rebounds from low abundance. Many are caught while anglers bottom fish for fluke. Good fishing in Niantic, New Haven Harbor by the breakwaters over to Woodmont/Milford Point and along Stratford shoals to Darien. One of the best eating saltwater fish you will ever catch. Weakfish is fairly good from shore at Eatons Neck, NY and at the Rye, NY Playland Pier. They've salso been reeled in at West Havens Sandy Point and Sandy Point Audubon Society.

Read the full report at this link: Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection

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05 July 2018

• Lions and Chiggers and Ticks...Oh my!


“…there are some things in the woods that I truly fear, because they can cause me both pain and illness. Worse, some of them are difficult (if not impossible) to see and can attack from anywhere.

“I speak of chiggers and ticks, two critters that can make a grown person cringe with horror and hysteria.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: AmericanHunter.com

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

04 July 2018

• Connecticut Shoreline Will Have Wind Turbines


“Wind turbines will soon be creating power off the Connecticut shoreline…

“DEEP announced on Tuesday it has accepted a bid from one of three companies to go ahead and start the building process. …”

Please visit this link to read the full article: WTNH.com

File photo

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

03 July 2018

• Tunnel Under LIS Ditched


“A proposal to build a tunnel under the Long Island Sound connecting Nassau and Westchester counties has been dropped…

The “State Department of Transportation Commissioner...said Thursday they decided not to move forward with the plan." He"...did not reveal further details as to why they are abandoning the plan. A study previously estimated the tunnel could cost up to $55 billion.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: NewYork.CBSLocal.com

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

01 July 2018

• Bob Sampson: A Good Read for Striper Fishermen


“We have all been through the ‘you should have been here yesterday’ scenario that has to do to some degree with the migratory behavior of many species that move into and through our region every year. Though a successful trip has more to do with knowledge and experience, which experienced, highly successful fishermen of all types have and earned through years and thousands of hours of being on the water.
Time of year, which equates to temperature, tidal conditions, time of day and availability of prey are all intertwined to create the conditions for a perfect fishing trip....

“Time of year, which equates to temperature, tidal conditions, time of day and availability of prey are all intertwined to create the conditions for a perfect fishing trip.…

Please visit this link to read the full article: NorwichBulletin.com

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URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/