30 April 2016

• Fish Near Angling Hotspots Are More Clever, Avoid Capture

“Scientists from Queensland and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization found it was easier to trick fish into taking a baited hook in areas less frequented by anglers.

“Fish are smarter than we gave them credit for.... The evidence is proof that fish learn from past experiences and from watching their peers reeled in by excited anglers….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: UPI

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

29 April 2016

• CT DEEP Weekly Fishing Report 28 April 2016

STRIPED BASS fishing is good to excellent for “schoolies” in most of the tidal rivers along the Connecticut shoreline. There are also some keepers in the mix as well (47 inch bass from the lower CT River). Striper spots include the Pawcatuck River, Mystic River, Thames River, Niantic River, lower Connecticut River (DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier and Dock and Dine), Black Hall River, New Haven Harbor (Sandy Point), Housatonic River and Norwalk Harbor including the islands.

Sand and bloodworms have been working the best, especially in turbid waters around the high tide. Casting swimming lures, small jigs (Chartreuse color) with twister tails, soft baits, and Kastmasters and other metal lures will all work. Fishing should get better as we approach the magical 55°F mark! The top-water fishing has been fanatastic.

WINTER FLOUNDER fishing remains slow but improving in the Poquonock River at Bluff Point State Park, Niantic River, The Brothers, Jordan Cove, lower Saugatuck River, Calf Pasture Beach area, Norwalk Islands (Cockonoe) and the channels in Norwalk Harbor. Other flounder spots include the lower Mystic River, and the mouth of the Thames River in the Pine Island area including Baker Cove.

WHITE PERCH fishing is good to excellent for these tasty panfish in most of the tidal rivers and coves along the Connecticut shoreline. Perch spots include the Pawcatuck River, Mystic River, Thames River, upper Niantic River, lower Connecticut River (DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier), Black Hall River, Lieutenant River, North/South Cove and Hamburg Cove. Shrimp and small worms are the key success.

WEAKFISH have also arrived in Long Island Sound! The Race, Plum Gut and the north side of Long Island including Gardiners Bay and the Peconics are early bluefish spots. Look for weakfish in Guilford/New
Haven Harbor over to the Milford/Stratford area along with the Peconics.

BLACK SEA BASS & SCUP opens May 1: Based on the CT DEEP Marine Fisheries Division trawl survey there are plenty of sea bass and scup in the sound. Looks to be a fantastic opener.

CTDEEP will post the complete report at this site, eventually: CTDEEP

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

28 April 2016

• Ten Places to Fish in Rhode Island

Includes some salt water spots:

“… here are 10 favorite fishing spots that expert fishing guides and anglers, charter captains and bait and tackle shop owners say have produced fish and great adventures for many....”

Please visit this link to read the full article: ProvidenceJournal

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

27 April 2016

• Plum Island Up for Grabs

“Plum Island, a federal facility off the North Fork within eyesight of the South Fork and coastal Connecticut, could soon be sold to private interests unless a broad effort by officials at several government levels and environmental groups succeeds in having it set aside for preservation, most wisely as a national wildlife refuge…

“In a plan approved by Congress to move the animal disease laboratory there to a site in Kansas, the 840-acre island would be disposed of at auction. Opposition to its sale is considerable in the region, and many residents hope the auction can be blocked and the island returned to a more natural state as parkland or a wildlife reserve....”

Please visit this link to read the full article: EastHamptonStar

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

26 April 2016

• Hudson River Stripers

“In New York State, the Hudson River is the main spawning ground for stripers, which can weigh up to 40 pounds or more…

“The best time to fish for them on the Hudson is usually the last week of April and first couple of weeks of May – give or take a few weeks either way....”

Please visit this link to read the full article: NewYorkUpState

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

25 April 2016

• Shad Run In the Connecticut River

“Yes, though not yet time to head for the river with a fishing rod, our most prevalent anadromous fish has indeed entered the river system and will soon be running like gangbusters, in numbers sufficient for productive recreational fishing…

“If this year’s spawning run is in keeping with the previous four, we’ll be looking at more than 416,000 shad passed by Barrett Fish Lift over Holyoke dam.

The highest single-season runs of the aforementioned four-year string serve as bookends, with 490,431 in 2012 and 412,656 last year....”

Please visit this link to read the full article: Recorder

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

24 April 2016

• CT DEEP Weekly Fishing Report 21 April 2016

STRIPED BASS fishing is good in the Housatonic River, Connecticut River (DEEP Marine Headquartersfishing pier), and the Black Hall River. Sand and blood worms will do the trick especially in murky water.

WINTER FLOUNDER fishing is on the slow side. Early season flounder spots include the lower Mystic River, Poquonock River at Bluff Point State Park, mouth of the Thames River in the Pine Island area including Baker Cove, Niantic River including the bay, and Norwalk Harbor.

BLACKFISH fishing spring season runs April 1st – April 30th. However, with water temperatures in the low 50’s °F fishing has been very good with worms, clams and Asian crabs. The New Haven breakwaters are one of the better early season fishing spots for tog. Try fishing in 8 – 25 feet of water. Shallower the better (warmer). This next week should be fantastic.

CTDEEP will get around to posting the complete report at this site, eventually: CTDEEP

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

23 April 2016

Long Island Sound, Housatonic River Saltwater Fishing Report: 20 April 2016

Click on any photo to enlarge...see a slide show:



This was the second day of Wayne and Yves's visit to sample the striper fishing in the Housatonic River.

We noted with amazement at how much green was to be seen on the trees along the River's bank just compared to the day before.

The day stared off with north winds blowing around 10 knots. It was actually reasonably warm out there on the water. Then, not predicted in NOAA's forecast for the day, the wind shifted 180° and was now howling in from the south at 20 knots. And, you'd think a south wind would be warm, but south means it was blowing on the Connecticut shoreline from Long Island Sound which is at best maybe 50°, so this south wind was actually colder than the north wind had been earlier.



Undaunted, we set out to break the day before's catch of 53 stripers. We were even optimistic enough to take along a fly rod which turned out to be a good thing as at times the all-white clouser minnow proved to be the most successful lure on the boat.

Her Yves fights a striper on a 7-weight fly rod...



...and lands the fish.

In fact, the clouser was so effective that Wayne tied one on his spinning rod with a couple of split shots above the fly and did very well on the stripers with that arrangement.



Bottom line: We finished the day with 67 stripers, no keepers.

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

22 April 2016

Long Island Sound, Housatonic River Saltwater Fishing Report: 19 April 2016

Click on any photo to enlarge...see a slide show:



If it's springtime, then the stripers are supposed to be running in the Housatonic River.


The arrival of the brant [small geese] is a sure sign of spring.


Don't think this bird cared much about the season of the year.


As to fishing: Our friends Wayne and Yves were visiting from Quebec. They were on their way to Boston to pick up some gear for the tour boat they operate on Lac Tremblant in Mont-Tremblant, Quebec, Canada, and stopped by here in CT for a few days to sample our spring fishing.

This link will lead you to photos of their tour-boat, the crew [Wayne, standing, left; Yves, kneeling, left], and the lake.



In the photo above Yves fights, and in this photo, lands the first striped bass he's ever caught.

Not a big fish but we wanted to record this first-striper event.



It was bloody cold out on the water, not helped by northwest winds gusting to as much as 25 knots [28.5 mph]. But as you can see from this shot of Wayne reeling in a striper, we were layered up for it.

Guys from Quebec know how to dress for the cold.



This was the biggest striper of the day...not a keeper, but a nice fish.

Bottom line is we caught 53 striped bass...all smallish...no keepers.

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

21 April 2016

• Fly Fishing: Palming the Reel

“Even if your fly reel has a solid drag, knowing how to palm the reel comes in handy for fighting a big fish. A little extra pressure can thwart a spool overrun on a redfish or stop a steelhead from reaching a logjam.

“Of course, palming takes some practice and skill, but if you remember these tips, you’ll master the art of the palm faster….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: FieldAndStream

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

20 April 2016

• Not The Best Way to Stop Commercial Poaching of Stripers in RI

“After a March summit at U.R.I. laid the groundwork, recreational anglers will be required to intentionally mutilate their perfect fish, in an effort to stop commercial fishermen from illegally selling them.

“ Perhaps more disturbing is those recreation and commercial anglers are the same people – just on different days....”

Please visit this link to read the full article: NewportThisWeek

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

• Are Zika Skeeters A Threat in Connecticut This Summer?

“The Zika-carrying Aedes aegypti mosquito spreads the disease through biting. Zika has been linked to serious birth defects in children born to mothers with the illness.

“The threat of the Zika virus grows as mosquito season approaches, but state health officials say it’s unlikely that anyone will be bitten in Connecticut by the disease-carrying insects….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: NorwichBulletin

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

19 April 2016

• Interview With A Fisherman Who Knows Striped Bass

“In an ideal world, what would you like to see happen for stripers? In the so-called “real world” are there some practical solutions that can happen?

“ We need to completely stop commercial fishing for striped bass, and we need to stop everyone from killing the big, old breeder fish....”

Please visit this link to read the full article: Forbes





• Stripers Also Active Off New Jersey


“The striped bass action along the oceanfront is showing signs of life as bass have started to move into our area….

“ Party boats and recreational anglers that have been out in the last week before the northeast winds arrived reported finding birds hovering over striped bass within a mile of the beach....”

Please visit this link to read the full article: NorthJersey.com

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

18 April 2016

• Fishing On Long Island

“In the back seat of his car parked at Jones Beach, a man slept with his arms wrapped around a big striped bass. A few hours earlier, I had seen him at sunrise sitting on the sand, telling passing anglers that he had caught the bass in the middle of the night…

“What a prize. It must have been 40 pounds. When he dragged it by the gill to his car, the fish left a fin trail in the sand all the way to the parking lot....”

Please visit this link to read the full article: Newsday






• Bluefish Already in New Jersey


“Bluefish arrived over the past few days. They don't seem to be those 15- to 20-pound bruisers that blitzed us about this time last year and continued into May…

“Scott's Bait and Tackle in Mystic Island weighed a 9.8-pound bluefish that seemed to top the early arrivals....”

Please visit this link to read the full article: PressOfAtlanticCity

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

17 April 2016

• Long Island Fishermen Ready for Striped Bass

“In most parts of Long Island, a few schoolies usually remain through the colder months in tidal creeks, harbors and back-bay waters. For many, these will be initial targets. Already, scattered reports of school bass encounters are coming in from Manhasset and Oyster bays, Northport Harbor and the Quogue Canal.

“Expect that action to build steadily with soft plastic baits like Bass Assassins and Slug-Gos as well as Bomber, Sebile and Yo-Zuri plugs bringing the most success....”

Please visit this link to read the full article: Newsday



• Western Sound (and Beyond) Fishing Report


“The striped bass bite is on again in the Hudson River above the George Washington Bridge. That word comes from anglers near Croton and the Newburgh-Beacon Bridge area…

“Meanwhile, Capt. Chris, on one of his Island Current trips from City Island in Long Island Sound, continues his successful scouting for winter flounder around Oyster Bay....”

Please visit this link to read the full article: NewYorkDailyNews

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

16 April 2016

• Finally…Back On the Housatonic River

Getting Shoo-Fly back on the water once she had come back from the Keys was delayed first by nasty weather and then by my spending some relaxing time in the hospital and recuperating from that. Finally, on Thursday, accompanied by Charlie W., we got back out there.

We saw boats landing small stripers about one minute from the marina and joined in the drift, picking up one schoolie after another.

As the fish in that spot were all on the small side, we decided to move upriver, in violation of the fishing rule: “Never leave fish to find fish.”

We located more fish, and boats working over them, up above the Merritt Parkway, but these fish all had lockjaw. So we worked our way back down the river, getting the occasional bump but finding no aggressively eating stripers.

Back at the spot that we never should have left we found fish still there, we caught a few, but they were scattered as the tide was dead low. We finished the day with 34 fish…the photo left shows the largest fish of the trip.

Yes, it was chilly out there: Water temp hit a high of 49° and the air temp probably wasn’t much above that; but, we were dressed for it and really only felt the chill when running the boat.

Tuesday, Wednesday next week, Wayne, whom you know from earlier this year in Islamorada, and Yves, who also fished with us in the Keys, will be here from Quebec for two days of striper-chasing.

I’m resting until they get here.



© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

15 April 2016

• I Didn’t Start Out As A Saltwater Fly Fisherman

It was in a Western Auto store that I bought my first fly rod. At that time, 1952, that hardware store was the only entity I could bicycle to that sold fishing gear…so, after collecting from my paper route customers, that’s where I pedaled my second-hand Schwinn.

The rod was definitely suited to be sold in a hardware store. It was made out of steel and was telescopic…section extending out of section until the rod reached its full 8 or 9 foot length. Made by True Temper, it was heavy and ugly; it had maybe four guides on it including the tip-top, but I didn’t know any better and was determined to learn how to use it.

The level line, as best I remember, was braid that was coated in some sort of smooth, plastic-like material…dark-brown in color.

The best part of the assembled outfit was the Bronson Royalist fly reel. No drag, just a click to retard the spool a bit as line was pulled off the reel.

The rod flexed all the way into the grip…horrible to cast…a real buggy whip. But I got the line on the reel, and the reel on the rod, and spent hours in the back yard flailing away. It worked, and it was with this set of gear that I caught my first fish on a fly rod…a 6-inch native brook trout from an unnamed creek in Milford, CT.

Eventually the rod rusted beyond telescoping and the line coating cracked and fell off in chunks. So I moved on to a fiberglass rod and a better line…same reel…and continued to fish for trout.

Although Milford was on the shoreline of Long Island Sound, I didn’t try fly fishing in salt water until the late 1960s. Just had no concept of how or why anyone would do that. But remembering having caught snapper bluefish as a kid, fishing with cane pole, bobber, and shiners off Milford town dock, and having been a fresh-water fly-tyer since age 12, I put together a couple of sparkly flies that I thought might attract snappers. Went out on one of the rock groins at Laurel Beach with one of the flies at the end of my trout rod’s leader. The flies worked and I caught a bunch of the little fighters.

This piqued my interest in salt water fly fishing. I began to read up on the subject. Read the chapter on “Salt Water Fly Fishing” in Joe Brooks’s Complete Book of Fly Fishing, published by Outdoor Life in 1958. Read the chapter on “Eastern Salt Water Streamer Fishing” in Joseph D. Bates, Jr.’s Streamer Fly Tying and Fishing, [Stackpole Company, 1966].

Somehow I determined that an 11-weight outfit was just what was needed for the gamefish of Long Island Sound. Bought a 9-foot Fenwick fiberglass rod and added a Pflueger Medalist #1498 reel and a weight-forward line to create an ensemble that would tax the arm of an Olympic shot-putter. But the rig cast pretty well and I was of an age when I could endure flinging a fly with it for a few hours without my arm going into spasm. So I whipped up several Brooks Blonde flies and set out for Cedar Beach where I’d heard the bluefish tended to congregate.

I was hoping there wouldn’t be any other fisherman around for this, first venture out with the new rig. Of course, that wasn’t to be the case. It was evening, after work, and I arrived to find a group of spin-fishermen flinging top-water plugs out into the relatively calm water. There was no sign of any fish activity so the spin guys were taking it easy, talking, making a few casts, swapping fish stories.

I walked to the beach a bit west of them and began to unlimber the 11-weight. A few guffaws from down the beach. A few snickers. I could feel the blood rising up the back of my neck. Made a few tentative casts. Was retrieving the Blonde…it must have been, say, 20 feet away from me, when…Wham! Something slammed the end of my line and took off for deeper water.

The fly line leaped…water showered off it. I was amazed. A quick look back to the east showed that the spin-fishermen were aware of what was going on with my line. They too were amazed.

The fish jumped…rattling its gills. It came in close to shore and then dashed off again. Fingers burned by the outgoing line…knuckles whacked by the revolving reel handle…I finally slid a 5-pound bluefish up onto the beach. Held it up. Made sure the spin fishermen got a look. Let it go back in the water. It swam off.

Nearly 20 years after catching that first 6-inch native brook trout, I was now a confirmed saltwater fly fisherman.

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC; author: Capt. Skip Persson

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

14 April 2016

• Tips for Keeping Those Hooks Sharp

“The idea that sharp hooks stick more fish is a no-brainer, yet I’m always shocked by how few anglers make hook sharpening part of their routine.

“If it seems like a chore, well, it’s not. Here are a few ­pointers that will give you an edge on the water….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: FieldAndStream

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

• CT DPH Touts Benefits of Fish Consumption

As the local fishing season gets underway, the Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) wants to remind anglers and the general public of the benefits of fish consumption. Both local and store-bought fish contain beneficial nutrients, such as fish oils, which can help brain development and prevent heart disease. Other beneficial nutrients include iodine, selenium and protein.

“Previous warnings about toxic chemicals in fish have alarmed the public and scared some people away. We are now learning there are plenty of healthy fish to eat, even during pregnancy. A little forethought about which fish you are taking home is all you need to make a smart choice,” said Brian Toal, DPH Epidemiologist. “DPH has studied the risks and benefits of different species which has allowed us to give the public, particularly women of childbearing age, sound advice on healthy fish choices.”

Recent studies have shown that fish consumption during pregnancy can improve children’s learning and IQ. However, DPH warns that choosing the right fish is important since some varieties of fish can still contain higher levels of contaminants such as PCBs and mercury.

DPH’s list of healthiest fish choices includes trout and sunfish from the state’s freshwater bodies, flounder (winter and summer varieties) and scup (porgy) from Long Island Sound, and wild salmon and pollock from the grocery store. DPH has identified these as beneficial species that can be consumed without limit. The Department’s fact sheets and website provide the complete listing of healthy fish choices.

While emphasizing what’s good to eat, DPH also alerts the public to local water bodies and species that contain too much contaminant to be eaten safely. The advice varies between the general public and pregnant women for these more highly contaminated species. For example, swordfish can be safely eaten once a month by the general public but not at all by women of child-bearing age. Similar restrictions are placed on bluefish and striped bass from Long Island Sound. Additionally, DPH has specific advisories for 14 freshwater bodies in Connecticut due to local contamination sources. Anglers should keep the DPH publication, If I Catch It, Can I Eat It, handy when deciding where fish.

For more information please visit the CT DPH fish advisory webpage.

For more specific questions on fish benefits and contaminants, contact DPH at 860-509-7740. For questions on fishing regulations and licenses, please call the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection at 860-424-3474.:

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

13 April 2016

• “I Got A Fish To Rise”

“It was a striper, not a very big one. Kind of in that “big schoolie” range. But it flashed silver and white, just a momentary thing, and it took a whack at my lure, missed and went back deep.

“I never could coax him to rise again, but in that quick flash I saw that there was still life on this planet, and that winter hadn’t killed everything and that maybe not today, but someday soon, I will catch a fish again. And that moment made all the difference. That unexpected fast flash from below told me everything I was looking for was still out there….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: CapeCodTimes

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

• DEEP Alerts Boaters to Dangers of Hypothermia

This notice is prompted by opening day of trout fishing in CT, but it applies to salt water as well as fresh:

“Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) reminds all boaters that even though the air temperatures are rising, the State’s waters are still in the mid to upper 40’s meaning sudden immersion into the water this cold can cause serious injury or death due to the shock of being immersed or from hypothermia for longer exposure.….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: CTDEEP

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

12 April 2016

• Saltwater: Change the Way the World Raises Food?

“Bren Smith's "vertical ocean farm" doesn't look very impressive, just some black and white buoys bobbing in the waves off Long Island Sound's Thimble Islands. But he's certain that what lies a few feet beneath those choppy waters can change the way the world raises and eats food.

“Those buoys are anchoring and keeping afloat a grid of ropes hanging about 6 feet below the surface of the Sound, well above the seabed. The ropes support tons of sugar kelp and crates and bags of oysters, mussels and scallops that Smith and his two co-workers tend and harvest year round….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: HartfordCourant

Photo unrelated to article

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

• Fly Fishing: Tips For A Good Hook Set

“Train yourself to set the hook same way you strip the fly-with just a little more vigor.

“Raise the rodtip only after the fish is on, and then be ready to clear the line….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: FloridaSportsman

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

11 April 2016

• Spring and Striped Bass…Suppose They Never Showed Up?

“After being teased with warm weather, with few exceptions all winter and into spring, she finally lowered the boom. We took the covers off our boats and jumped into the spring refitting ritual only to be slammed with high winds and torrential rains.

“Last week things began to look up, so as hope springs eternal we got back into the spirit of trying to gain a week or two on the season opener and had our hopes dashed this weekend with gale force winds then eight inches of heavy wet snow was plowed into a mini-mountain at the end of my dead end driveway….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: FallRiverWickedLocal

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

10 April 2016

• Long Island Sound Has Problems…But There Is Some Improvement

“Dr. Gobler…pointed out that, after 15 years of constant work and monitoring the health of the Long Island Sound, 2015 was the first year there was no ‘dead zone,’ (where there is no oxygen in the water), in the Sound.

“’Last year, also, large numbers humpback and beluga whales were spotted in the Sound for the first time in decades. When effort is put in, the system can respond and recovery is possible,’ he said….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: EastEndBeacon

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

09 April 2016

• New Haven Harbor Fed By Three “Impaired” Rivers

“Combined sewer overflows, contaminated storm water runoff, lawn fertilizers and lingering chemicals from dozens of power and manufacturing plants are just some of the pollutants hurting Greater New Haven watersheds.

“All three rivers in Greater New Haven — West, Mill and Quinnipiac — are on the impaired waters list of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: NewHavenRegister

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

08 April 2016

• CT Has Suffered A “Staggering” Loss of Tidal Wetlands

“A new study says one-third of all the tidal wetlands that surround Long Island Sound have disappeared since the 1880s. The Environmental Protection Agency calls the loss staggering.

“The study was released last week by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other state and federal agencies. It says that since the 1880s, Connecticut has lost more than 5,000 acres of wetlands and New York has lost about 2,500 acres.….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: WSHU

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

07 April 2016

• Prohibition on the Taking of Alewife and Blueback Herring from Connecticut Waters Extended for another Year

“Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) today announced that the prohibition on the taking of alewives and blueback herring from most inland and marine waters in Connecticut has been extended for another year.

“This action was initially taken in April of 2002, and has been extended each successive year because there has been no improvement in populations of these species during the past year. The current action by DEEP Commissioner Robert Klee extends the prohibition through March 31, 2017….”

The complete notice will eventually appear at this website: CTDEEP3

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

• Shoo-Fly Fishing Update

I don’t often write really personal stuff…what happened on a fishing trip is about the extent of it. But perhaps reading about my recent experience with heart problems may have some benefit for one of my readers, so here we go:

I had a heart attack last October; not a bad one as they go. The docs catheterized me and put in a bare metal stent at the site of the blockage. They took me off Plavix, the Rx that’s supposed to keep stents free from plaque buildup, after 30 days.

Then, as you may be aware, I went to Florida, enjoyed the time there, and came back home 15 March. The boat came north much earlier than usual and was in the water by 29 March…so, time to go fishing, right?

Nope. On 31 March I developed heart symptoms…very similar to those in October: Back to the hospital where they determined there was no heart attack this time, just that the @#$%& bare metal stent they put in had plugged up…95% occluded. Another catheterization and a new stent, a medicated stent this time, and I’m now home recovering. I’m told I’ll be on Plavix for at least a year, or for the rest of my life, (whichever comes first?). Perhaps, had I been kept on that Rx last fall, this last trip to hospital might have been avoided…well, who knows?

I visit the cardiologist on 11 April for a follow-up on this last trip to hospital. We’ll see what happens after that.

Take care of your heart: It may be the only one you’ll ever have.

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

06 April 2016

• Sad About That Missed Striper?

“We bet you know the heartache of dropping a huge striped bass. Truth is, it’s often your own fault.

“From proper prep work to fight techniques to end-game insurance, these tips from a pro will keep you from feeling that sting ever again….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: FieldAndStream

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/

05 April 2016

• Should Madison Beaches Be Replenished with Housatonic Dredge Spoils?

“UC San Diego biologists who examined the biological impact of replenishing eroded beaches with offshore sand found that such beach replenishment efforts could have long-term negative impacts on coastal ecosystems.

“The scientists, who studied the effects of beach replenishment efforts on the abundance of intertidal invertebrates at eight different beaches in San Diego County, discovered that the movement of sand onto those beaches resulted in a more than twofold reduction in the abundance of intertidal invertebrates after 15 months….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: ScienceDaily

© 2016 Shoo-Fly Charters, LLC

URL: http://connecticutsaltwaterfishing.com/