30 June 2015

• Massachusetts Claims To Have Stripers Aplenty


“A 53-pound, 4-ounce striped bass was weighed in at Surfland Bait and Tackle this week.

”The giant bass was fooled by drifting a live mackerel in the Merrimack River. There are other keepers in the river along with a lot of schoolies.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: LowellSun


• More on MA Fishing


“Bass fishing has been great at Provincetown and Race Point but the crowd has grown, especially on commercial bass days. More striper fishermen are sticking to the South Shore where there’s room to spread out and fish live mackerel among the deep-water ledges.

”Small baitfish have stripers on the feed in the three bays of Plymouth, Duxbury and Marshfield.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: BostonHerald


• Writer Says MA Commercial Fishermen Pushing the Envelope


“If anyone out there believes that someone with a striper tag is out there before opening day, which was yesterday, and caught fish and released them rather than stacking them in coolers or fish boxes with ice for sale on June 25, then I have some odds that the Red Sox will win the World Series this year that you should put all of your money on.

”The commercial guys have been working up around Provincetown and along the Elizabeths, as well as off Sandwich and the east end of the Canal and they’re not going to burn gas money to release fish they can sell.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: CapeNewsNet


• Massachusetts South Coast Fishing


“Much of the saltwater fishing in the Fall River area is centered around the Taunton River and Mount Hope Bay.

”Popular spring and summer species include: striped bass, bluefish, tautog, fluke and scup, a few weakfish, and the occasional run of bonito and false albacore in late summer.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: SouthCoastToday


29 June 2015

• Wanna Know Where Ta Fish In Noo Yawk City?


• What to do while she goes to Macy’s, Saks, and Bloomy’s

“A detailed online map of public saltwater fishing sites in New York City is now available…

”The map provides information on a fishing site's location, the available amenities and mass transit information. Each site description includes links to basic angling and outdoor recreation information in New York State.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: LongIsland.com


• NYC-Area Fish Report


“It seems the Summer Solstice has stimulated our metro fisheries.

”Porgy fishing has picked up. Fluke and ling action continues to keep anglers of all ages busy.

”And night fishing for striped bass and bluefish has improved.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: NYDailyNews


28 June 2015

• Connecticut, Long Island Sound, Housatonic River Saltwater Fishing Report: 25 June 2015



Charlie W. and I fished for a few hours on Thursday afternoon...wrong time of day...wrong tide [it was dead low when we started...I prefer the outgoing tide].


We ran over to Milford...went all the way up to the yacht club...saw no gamefish...no bunker.


Returning to the mouth of the Housatonic we caught a couple of schoolies...


...but had our best luck after a quick run west...where we found more abundant schoolies and small bluefish...




Back at the marina we spotted this, the latest winner of the "Mine's Bigger Than Yours" contest.

Yes, that's four [count 'em, 4] 350-horse outboards on that boat...a total of 1,400 horsepower [for the arithmetic-challenged].



And speaking of big ones, here's a photo of a 65.5-lb. striper caught near Buoy 18.

We don't know what the fisherman's name is, what bait was used, or whether or not the fisherman practiced CPR***, but it was one heckuva fish.

If anyone has more details about this catch, we'd be happy to print them here.

CPR***: Catch, Photograph, Release.


Source: ConnecticutSaltwaterFishing.com

• “Connecticut’s 2015 Complete Fireworks Celebration"


"Wondering where you can see fireworks as the Fourth of July festivities commence?

"For that reason, Patch has brought you a complete guide of displays taking place across Connecticut Patch towns and beyond. We know you will travel for an extravagant display so we brought you a complete listing.

"The guide is organized by county and date.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: Patch


27 June 2015

• More On Striped Bass CPR***


“’Let me show you the fish I caught,’ my friend Phil said to me the other day. He pulled out his phone and started flipping through images of striped bass. They were large fish. Trophy size. He'd been having a good spring.

”Almost as an afterthought, he said, ‘Of course, I put back all these big ones - the breeders. I only keep them when they're just the legal limit….’”

***Catch, Photograph, Release

Please visit this link to read the full article: CapeCoastAndIslands


• Jaws: Movie Premiered 40 Years Ago…But For Real On Cape Cod Today


“Forty years ago, when ‘Jaws’ came swaggering onto the scene as the first true summer blockbuster — it grossed $438 million in the first 11 weeks—it tapped into both a primal fear of monsters of the deep and maybe a lingering guilt that the captain Quints of the world had helped create a safe summer haven like Amity Island by relentlessly hunting the things we feared.

”If Cape Cod in 1975 was all sand dunes and salty air, with nothing more dangerous than a mob of bluefish or the occasional Portuguese man-of-war…that is not the case now.

”Within the past decade, the Cape has morphed into one of the world’s hot spots for great white….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: CapeCodTimes


25 June 2015

• Connecticut DEEP Marine Fishing Report – 25 June 2015



STRIPED BASS fishing continues to impress...with some large “cow” stripers being caught by anglers using live or chunk Menhaden (bunker). Folks are starting to do well with bucktails and diamond jigs for stripers on the larger reefs at the beginning and end of the tides. Finding the schools are a challenge but if found most are being rewarded.... The usual striper spots include the Watch Hill reefs, lower Thames River, the Race, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, outer Bartlett Reef, Black Point, Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River (Great Island), Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef (outer), Sixmile Reef, Falkner Island area, the reefs off Branford, and New Haven Harbor (including Sandy Point).

Also, Charles Island area, Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Penfield Reef, around the Norwalk Islands, Cable and Anchor Reef, and the Cows off Stamford.

BLUEFISH fishing is slow. Early morning and evening times are best especially for some top-water fishing action. Bluefish spots include the Race, Sluicway, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, Long Sand Shoal, Sixmile Reef, Falkner Island area, New Haven Harbor, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middleground, Penfield Reef, and Cable and Anchor Reef. SNAPPERS will soon arrive in the tidal creeks and rivers.

FLUKE fishing remains fair to good. Anglers targeting fluke report that skates, sea robins, and dogfish appear to be in plentiful supply. Fluke spots include the typical locations: south shore of Fishers Island (Isabella Beach, Wilderness Point), Napatree Point and along the beach, off the Stonington breakwater, mouth of the Mystic River to Groton Long Point, Thames River channel, Twotree Island Channel, Black Point/Niantic Bay/River, Long Sand Shoal, Westbrook-Clinton area, Falkner Island area, and New Haven Harbor including by the breakwaters.

Also, off the mouth of the Housatonic River, Bridgeport harbor and around the Norwalk Islands. Pink and green teasers seem to be producing best. The traditional “fluke sandwich” (long squid strip and spearing) is working as well as mackerel strips.... Minimum size is 18 inches and the daily creel limit is 5 fish per person. Note: New York has the same summer flounder regulations as Connecticut. However, Rhode Island is already open with an 18 inch minimum length and an 8 fish daily creel limit. Since Rhode Island has a higher daily creel limit than Connecticut and New York please make sure you abide by the state with the most restrictive regulation when crossing (by boat) state boundaries.

PORGY fishing is improving...with “Reef Slammers” measuring 10-17 inches (“hubcap size”) in length still being reported at every fishing pier, reef or rock pile. Try Gardners Island, Milford (Charles Island), Montauk and Niantic (Bartletts Reef). Porgy fishing has also been reported at these very accessible shore fishing locations: Calf Pasture beach, Jennings and Penfield beach, Seaside Park, Rocky Neck State Park, Meigs Point Hammonassett State Park and Fort Trumbull State Park. Locate your favorite Enhanced Shore Fishing Opportunities for these excellent eating “Reef Slammers”. These “Panfish of the Sea” are easily caught on sandworms/cut squid/conch or any other small piece of bait. Contact your local bait and tackleshop for updated fishing information (see page 14 of the 2015 CT Angler’s Guide).

BLACK SEA BASS fishing is short of awesome. The hot spot continues to be Falkner Island. Fishing over deep water structure in 80 to 120 ft around slack tide will produce some trophy-sized “humpbacks”. Fish shallower and you will catch plenty of keeper-sized sea bass. Angler’s reporting “shorts” everywhere...including on sand flats/shoals. It’s important to continue to move from structure to structure and fish around slack tide to find these beautiful and awesome eating fish. Remember, CT black sea bass regulations are as follows...14 inch min. length, 3 fish daily limit from June 1st to August 31 and a five fish daily limit from September 1 to December 31st. Berkley Gulp (swimming mullet) on a spro jig and also squid with a spinner works great for these “Bucketmouths”.

BLACKFISH fishing season reopens July 1 in Connecticut waters. The daily creel limit is 2 fish per person and the minimum size is 16 inches. Anglers please note: CTDEEP and Marine Fishing Clubs have been tagging blackfish with yellow American Littoral Society Tags to determine their movements and growth rates. This critical information will help us understand and manage this important resident species. Please record Tag Number, Location (Lat/Long), Length and weight of Blackfish and Date of Capture. www.littoralsociety.org 18 Hartshorne Dr., Ste.1, Highlands New Jersey 07732. Thank you very much for your cooperation and participating in Marine Fisheries Management.

STRIPED SEA ROBIN fishing is very good. “Poor-Man’s Lobster” are found wherever one is fishing for summer flounder (fluke) or sea bass (bottom fishing). With fish measuring over 20 inches and “barking up a storm” (grunting noise). West Haven sand bar and your favorite local beach have been producing for shore anglers. They love sandworms and squid.

HICKORY SHAD fishing is fair in the Black Hall River, lower Connecticut River by the DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier, Clinton Harbor and the lower Housatonic River.

WHITE PERCH fishing is good for this species which is closely related to striped bass. Perch are found in most of the tidal rivers and coves along the Connecticut shoreline. Productive spots include the Pawcatuck River, Mystic River, Thames River, upper Niantic River, lower Connecticut River (DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier), Black Hall River, Lieutenant River, North/South Cove and Hamburg Cove. Grass Shrimp and a small piece of sandworm fished on the bottom are the keys to success. Another trophy 13.5 inch, 2 pound white perch was caught at Ferry Landing State Park in Old Lyme on a sandworm this past weekend under the railroad bridge.

BLUE CRAB fishing is improving in the tidal creeks. All sizes of crabs continue to be found...a good sign for the upcoming summer months of crabbing. There have been some very large “jimmies” (male crab with its T-
Shaped apron) reported (seven inch carapace width) in lower tidal creeks and rivers. The “Sooks” (mature female crab) will soon be following. Remember...all egg bearing females must be released with unavoidable harm. Min. carapace length is 5 inches for a hard shell crab. Looks to be a very good crabbing season...contact your local bait and tackle shop for update information, crab traps and bait.

SHARK species you may encounter in coastal waters of connecticut: sand tiger and sandbar (brown) shark are protected and prohibited species and must be released unharmed. if you don’t know, please let it go! please visit the nmfs coastal shark information page for more information.
Read the full article at this link: Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection


• How Bass Feed


• TMI? Probably Works the Same Way for Stripers As for Largemouths

“Fish are power eaters. In many species, large muscles running along their backs and bellies provide bursts of speed for chasing down prey. Then, at the very instant they close in, they vacuum victims into their suddenly gaping mouths with overwhelming suction.

”It turns out that these power surges are no anatomical coincidence. A new study shows that largemouth bass get their slurping power from the very same muscles that provide their swimming power.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: Science Daily


• Rhode Island Fishing Report


“The bluefish bite is very strong, with anglers landing fish in bays and coves, and along the coastal shore. Greenwich Bay was teaming with bluefish Saturday….

”Striped bass are in the Bay, but you have to work for them, said Ken Landry of Ray’s Bait & Tackle in Warwick. …”

Please visit this link to read the full article: ProvidenceJournal


• This Is Fly…Latest Issue Available


Articles on smallmouth bass, trout, tuna, muskellunge, fish art, canoe fishing, tarpon, and permit.

Gorgeous photography.

Please visit this link to see the latest issue: ThisIsFly


24 June 2015

• “Video: Topwater Striper Strikes”


“The striped bass fishing has been awesome out at Provincetown, reports Captain Bobby Rice of Reel Deal Fishing Charters. Bobby shot this underwater footage of striped bass hitting topwater lures from Gibbs and Strategic Angler.

”Enjoy!…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: OnTheWater

Photo is from Shoo-Fly's library of striper pix.


• And This Too Shall Pass….


“…the New York Metropolitan Outdoor Writers Association has taken its last breath. About a dozen of us bid our final farewell during a gathering at Rooney’s Oceanfront Restaurant in Long Branch, N.J. last week.

”Some of you may remember the organization as the Rod and Gun Editors of Metropolitan New York and many may have even attended one or more of its dinners during its 80 years of existence. But much the same as the remaining members, the group has gotten old.

”While none of the founding members was there to say goodbye, they and others were remembered with a toast and a minute of silence….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: NYDailyNews

And what does this mean for the rest of us?


23 June 2015

• “Old Habits Are Hard To Break….”


“Many of my friends and clients have been catching and releasing stripers shortly after they caught their first linesiders, but I am an old catch-and-fillet guy who has been spreading the wealth since I first began bass fishing over what has been my entire adult lifetime.

”I began fishing for stripers when the minimum size was a mere 16 inches and you could keep all you caught because there was never a notion that one day the striper resource would be in danger of collapsing.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: HeraldNews


• Nitrogen Is Killing Our Long Island Sound


“…in recent weeks, excess nitrogen pollution has caused the most horrifying die-offs. The 200-plus dead turtles that washed up on the eastern end of Long Island over the last month? Scientists know they were killed when they ate shellfish poisoned by toxic algae blooms fueled by nitrogen pollution.

” The tens of thousands of dead fish coating Peconic Bay’s beaches? They suffocated when they swam into a no-oxygen dead zone—where the oxygen was sucked out of the water by rotting algae—caused by excess nitrogen’’’.”

Please visit this link to read the full article: StratfordStar

File photo.


22 June 2015

• CPR for Striped Bass


“One of the biggest trends in striped bass fishing is the practice of CPR: Catch, Photograph and Release.

”The majority of striped bass caught by fishermen are released out of regulatory necessity. A striped bass must be at least 28 inches long to be considered a “keeper,” and this year you’re only allowed to take home one keeper per day.

”However, there is a growing legion of fishermen who prefer to send their keepers back into the ocean simply for the pleasure of knowing they will swim on to spawn another day and maybe even get caught again.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: BostonHerald


• One Fisherman’s Favorite Flies


“The bottom line is no matter how much I experiment I seem to always go back to the same flies that always seem to work.

”Some of it has to do with the action or color of the fly, and sometime I think I have so much confidence that I will find the right combination of feather and fur to catch fish.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: HeraldNews


21 June 2015

• Big Redfish Caught on Cape Cod


“Red drum are a rare catch north of New Jersey, but at least two have been reported in New England waters in past 5 years.

”Some fishery scientists suspect that warming ocean waters could be one reason that red drum are venturing farther north.…”

Wikipedia: ”The red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), also known as channel bass, redfish, spottail bass or simply reds, is a game fish that is found in the Atlantic Ocean from Massachusetts to Florida and in the Gulf of Mexico from Florida to Northern Mexico….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: OnTheWater


• 10 Saltwater Lures That Work Anywhere


“Crossover lures for any species and region:

Lure #1: “Tady Lures: This design resembles jigs popularized in the Northeast, but the action is quite different. Due to construction and materials, these lures flutter on the drop and swim during the retrieve. A number of East Coast ­species — stripers, bluefish, black sea bass and more — have given their sign of approval….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: SaltWaterSportsman

Photo by Salt Water Sportsman


20 June 2015

• Connecticut, Long Island Sound, Housatonic River Saltwater Fishing Report: 17 June 2015

• Part 2: We got into a mixed bunch of stripers and bluefish



On Wednesday Charlie W. and I traveled to New Haven Harbor as we'd heard there had been some good fishing there.

• Click on any photo to enlarge



We got into stripers and bluefish...


...none of which were any great size...


...but still a lot of fun on light tackle.


Beautiful day...


...that this osprey seemed also to enjoy.


Couldn't do much with surface lures, however, the fish readily took the 1/4-oz. jig and swim-bait combination.


All the stripers went back in the water, but Charlie took two blues home to the smoker.


Source: ConnecticutSaltwaterFishing.com


19 June 2015

• Connecticut, Long Island Sound, Housatonic River Saltwater Fishing Report: 17 June 2015

• Part 1: Catching Up On Some Photos From Other Trips



Val S. was fishing with some local residents in Costa Rica when one of them pulled up this large roosterfish.

• Click on any photo to enlarge



Seal we spotted at Middleground.


Did you notice that CTDEEP's marine fishing report for 18 June included info on the availability of the ubiquitous sea robin? What is fishing in Long Island Sound coming to?





What a school of unmolested bunker, happily finning along the surface of the water, looks like.


Cormorants are not very good painters.


Mark M. was kind enough to send us this photo of a very nice striped bass...caught in the Connecticut River area.


Egret...beautiful flyer.


Source: ConnecticutSaltwaterFishing.com


18 June 2015

• Connecticut DEEP Marine Fishing Report – 18 June 2015



STRIPED BASS fishing continues to impress, with very large bass being reported (55 inches). Doesn’t matter what time of the day, daytime fishing under bunker schools is hot. We are transitioning to a nighttime/dawn and dusk bite. The western and central sound is the place to be. Buoy 18 (Stratford) has been a hot spot. The bass fishing will improve in the east as we speak. Legal size Porgies or trolling a Tube and Worm (red) have produced.

Striper spots include the Watch Hill reefs, lower Thames River, the Race, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, outer Bartlett Reef, Black Point (15 to 25 feet), Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River (Great Island to Essex), Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef (outer), Sixmile Reef, Falkner Island area, the reefs off Branford, and New Haven Harbor (including Sandy Point).

Also, Charles Island area, Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Penfield Reef, around the Norwalk Islands, Cable and Anchor Reef, Stamford Harbor and the Cows off Stamford.

BLUEFISH fishing is fair. Still no real consistent action for trophy “choppers” yet. Early morning and evening times are best especially for some top-water fishing action. Try Millstone and mouth of the CT River for “Harbor Blues” (16 to 22 inches). Other bluefish spots include the Race, Sluicway, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, Long Sand Shoal, Sixmile Reef, Falkner Island area, New Haven Harbor, bouys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middleground, Penfield Reef, and Cable and Anchor Reef. SNAPPERS will be here in 2 – 3 weeks, arriving in the tidal creeks and rivers.

FLUKE fishing is good and getting better with a lot of flatfish to be had. You got to spend some time getting “keepers,” there are a lot (I mean a lot) of “shorts”. A good sign for the future. The summer flounder have transitioned from feeding on squid to now feeding on mantis shrimp. LIS anglers reported fluke from 3 to 4 lbs being common, with a 12 pounder being the largest to date. Anglers targeting fluke report that searobins are extremely plentiful (bait stealers). Time to start fishing deeper ( 30 -70 feet).

Fluke spots include typical fishy locations: Montauk (best spot), south shore of Fishers Island (Isabella Beach, Wilderness Point), Napatree Point and along the beach, off the Stonington breakwater, mouth of the Mystic River to Groton Long Point, Thames River channel, Two Tree Island Channel, Black Point/Niantic Bay/River, Off Seaside and Waterford beach, Long Sand Shoal, Westbrook-Clinton area (Clinton Harbor), Falkner Island area, West Haven to Woodmont, and New Haven Harbor including by the breakwaters. Also, off the mouth of the Housatonic River (Milford), and around the Norwalk Islands.

Try drifting with a white or pink Bucktail Jig and attach a Berkely 3”-5” Gulp (Swimming Mullet) in chartreuse, green, white or pink. Pink colored imitation squid have also been producing well...add a spinner to your fluke rig to create a flash, attracting those big flatfish.Minimum size is 18 inches and the daily creel limit is 5 fish per person. Note: New York has the same summer flounder regulations as Connecticut. However, Rhode Island is already open with an 18 inch minimum length and an 8 fish daily creel limit. Since Rhode Island has a higher daily creel limit than Connecticut and New York please make sure you abide by the state with the most restrictive regulation when crossing (by boat) state boundaries.

PORGY fishing is good...with large “Reef Slammers” measuring 10-18.5 inches (“hubcap size”) in length still being reported at Gardners Island, Milford (Charles Island), Montauk and Niantic (Bartletts Reef). Porgy fishing has also been reported at these very accessible shore fishing locations: Calf Pasture beach, Jennings and Penfield beach, Rocky Neck State Park, Meigs Point Hammonassett State Park and Fort Trumbull State Park. Locate your favorite Enhanced Shore Fishing Opportunities for these excellent eating “Reef Slammers”. These “Panfish of the Sea” are easily caught on sandworms/cut squid/conch or any other small piece of bait. Contact your local bait and tackleshop for updated fishing information (see page 14 of the 2015 CT Angler’s Guide).

BLACK SEA BASS fishing is really getting better. The hot spot is Falkner Island. Fishing over deep water structure in 80 to 120 ft around slack tide will produce some trophy-sized “humpbacks”. Fish shallower and you will catch plenty of keeper-sized sea bass. Anglers are reporting “shorts” everywhere...including sand flats/shoals. It’s important to continue to move from structure to structure to find these awesome eating fish. Remember, CT black sea bass regulations are as follows...14 inch min. length, 3 fish daily limit from June 1st to August 31 and a five fish daily limit from September 1 to December 31st. Berkely Gulp (swimming mullet) on a jig and also squid with a spinner works great for these “Bucketmouths”.

STRIPED SEA ROBIN fishing is short of fantastic. “Poor-Man’s Lobster” are found wherever one is fishing for summer flounder (fluke) or sea bass. With fish measuring over 22 inches and barking up a storm. West Haven sand bar and your favorite local beach have been producing for shore anglers. They love sandworms and squid.

HICKORY SHAD fishing continue to be slow after the recent rains. Few fish reported at the DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier. It’s anybody’s guess as to where they go. Connecticut Tarpon (Hickory shad) can be found mixed in with schoolie striped bass, menhaden and harbor blues. Flood or Ebb tide is best and lures of choice are a willow leaf (silver), kastmaster (single hook), small plastic jigs (white or chartreuse), and or shad darts in various colors.

WHITE PERCH fishing is good for these tasty panfish related to striped bass. Perch are found in most of the tidal rivers and coves along the Connecticut shoreline. Productive spots include the Pawcatuck River, Mystic River, Thames River, upper Niantic River, lower Connecticut River (DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier), Black Hall River, Lieutenant River, North/South Cove and Hamburg Cove. Grass Shrimp and a small piece of sandworm fished on the bottom are the keys to success. Another 14.5 inch 2.3 pound white perch was caught at Ferry Landing State Park in Old Lyme on a sandworm this past weekend under the railroad bridge.

BLUE CRAB fishing is fair in the tidal creeks. All sizes of crabs continue to be found...a good sign for the upcoming summer months of crabbing. There have been some very large “jimmies” (male crab with its T-
Shaped apron) reported (eight inch carapace width) in the lower CT River. The “Sooks” (mature female crab) will soon be following. Remember...all egg bearing females must be released with unavoidable harm. Min. carapace length is 5 inches for a hard shell crab. Looks to be a very good crabbing season.

Read the full article at this link: Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection


• Stripers and Bottle Plugs


“On my third try, I clipped on a 3-ounce bottle plug and heaved it toward the dark eastern horizon, enjoying the satisfying feeling of the plug peeling line off the open spool as it sailed to deeper waters.

”The moment the plug touched down, I dropped my rod tip and reeled as fast as possible to take up the slack line and come tight….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: OnTheWater


• A Bunker By Any Other Name….


“Atlantic menhaden, or pogies as they are locally referred to, are a great bait fish for striped bass.

”… Game fish and seabirds, sharks and whales all seek out these oily fish as a favorite meal, making menhaden a crucial link in the ocean food chain….

Please visit this link to read the full article: ProvidenceJournal


17 June 2015

• Fly Fishing: “Need To Offer Them More Meat”


“’We need to offer them more meat,’ says Rosenbauer, who hosts the Orvis Fly Fishing Guide Podcast. Try a Blados Crease Fly on a sinking line, something with a rattle, a popper or even a Gurgler. Rosenbauer likes the last two for their helpless-fish noise and Deceivers for their wide silhouette.

”After selecting your [fly] and deciding on your move, you still face a relatively large area of water. Casting willy-nilly into an area the size of a volleyball court is more likely to scare a fish than tempt it.

Please visit this link to read the full article: FloridaSportsman


• Getting Started in Fly Fishing


"There’s something incredibly beautiful in the way a well-cast fly line unfurls in the air, gently delivering a hook adorned with a few twists of thread and some feathers to a distant target.

”Romantic images of fly fishing have drawn many newcomers to the sport in recent years and caught the attention of many more who would like to learn the art of catching fish on a fly.

” If you’ve been thinking about getting started fly fishing, you may wonder, how does one begin? Where can you learn the proper methods of casting? What equipment do you need? How do you choose from the hundreds of fly patterns available…?”

Please visit this link to read the full article: LinkToArticle


16 June 2015

• In New York Commercial Fishing Wants In On Spearing Stripers


“Under state law, [only] recreational fishing enthusiasts can fire spears into the deep blue depths to snag striped bass.

”A bill before the state Senate would provide commercial fishermen with the same right.

”…[the] bill would allow the use of spears, spear guns and underwater guns for commercial bass fishing, as apparently is allowed for other types of commercial fishing.

Please visit this link to read the full article: LinkToArticle


• The Striped Bass


“…What we have heard on the water the last few years is now being reflected in scientific reports. There is a wide concern in the decline of large breeding females, the driver of the overall population of Striped Bass, measured as the Spawning Stock Biomass (SSB); now estimated at 128 million fish just shy of the 127 million fish "unsustainable" threshold and well short of the target level.

”On a positive note the younger, smaller classes of Striped Bass are on a strong incline but are still a few years away from making an impact on the SSB….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: HuffingtonPost


15 June 2015

• Environmental Crisis: Eastern Long Island


“The dead turtles, about 100 of them, started washing ashore near here in late April. Then came the dead fish, in numbers no one had seen before.

”By this week, tens of thousands of fish carcasses had bobbed to the surface of the Peconic River, which runs along the southern border of this town, and in adjoining Flanders Bay, washing ashore in putrid drifts...."

File photo.

Please visit this link to read the full article: NewYorkTimes


• Coast Guard, Good Sam, Save Three From Capsized Boat Near Stratford


“The Coast Guard rescued three people Sunday after their boat capsized near Stratford, Connecticut.

”At approximately 2:30 p.m., a good Samaritan called the Coast Guard Sector Long Island Sound command center and said three people were in the water near the mouth of the Housatonic River.…”

Please visit this link to read the full article: CoastGuardNews


• June: Month of Fishing Choices


“Mid-June is an interesting period for local anglers because it is a time when the early spring bite melts into summer patterns. In the process, fishermen have a ton of choices, not the least of which is deciding whether to selectively target trophies or enjoy fast fishing with mostly toss backs.

”Striper fans, for example….”

Please visit this link to read the full article: NewsDay


14 June 2015

• Western Sound: “Group Working To Stop Pollution Threatening Aquatic Life, Closing Beaches”


“A good, soaking rain like the area has seen in recent days can do wonders for well-drained lawns and garden plants — and because of things like problem sewage and septic pipes and systems, can help spell the doom of the western Long Island Sound.

”In places like Darien, Norwalk, Stamford and Greenwich, where maritime culture and beaches are part of the local identity, rainstorms can flush dangerous bacteria and waste into sound waters….”
p>Please visit this link to read the full article: DarienTimes