25 February 2015

• #41: Islamorada Journal 2015…25 FEB Wednesday: Let’s Admit It: Fishing Here, Right Now, Stinks...Part II

I should have mentioned in Tuesday's post that we haven't seen any bluefish this year. Last year we were up to our armpits with them. I caught so many that I had to have osteopathic treatments on my shoulder when I got home...no joke! This year none, zero, nada, zip, zilch.

Any time you get tired of hearing me gripe about the wind and the lousy fishing...just let me know.

I'd still rather be here dealing with the weather and the lack of fish than back north enduring sub-zero temperatures.

Our fishing trip on Tuesday was a mirror-image of the last one...in terms of fish caught. But that was not so bad for us as we were on a mission to find permit...which we did. We saw, threw at, and were largely ignored by permit, tarpon, sharks, and barracudas. So no photo-worthy fish again...I'll just post a few snapshots from the trip.

Click on any photo to see enlargement gallery.



Coast Guard Auxiliary is active in Islamorada.

In this instance they're using someone's private boat, not one provided by the federal government.

Wonder if the owner gets paid gas mileage.



This may look like Wayne's standing on a golf course, but he's actually on the bow of the boat and the green stuff you're seeing is sea grass in about four feet of water.

Would that the water were this clear in Long Island Sound.



These two posts mark a ditch...a narrow band of deep water that cuts through an otherwise unpassable sandbar.

The little pointers at the top of each post tell boaters on which side of the posts one should travel to avoid running aground.

The cormorants are resting and drying their wings.



Here's Yves and Wayne hacking around on the bow of Shoo-Fly.


In this action shot Wayne has cast a live crab to a permit and is manipulating the rod so as to bring the crab closer to the fish.

No takers.



Hard to tell from this photo, but it's a smallish sea turtle that appears to have barnacles on its shell.


Water rising up from about three feet deep to a sandbar...deeper water on the other side.


White pelicans.

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