31 October 2012

• Bird Pix from Recent Fishing Trips



Click on any photo to enlarge


Geese over the old Avco building




Mute swans




More geese...heading south...or to the nearest golf course




Probably an immature black-crowned night heron




American Oystercatchers




Brant




Canada Geese


30 October 2012

• What Our Driveway Looked Like Tuesday Morning




• Connecticut, Long Island Sound, Housatonic River Saltwater Fishing Report: OCT 2012



A few photos from recent fishing trips.




Roy P. and I got into schoolies and blues one day.




Pulling the no-wake buoys at the mouth of the Housatonic.

Boaters should be reminded however, that removing the buoys does not remove their responsibility to transit the area in a manner that doesn't endanger other boaters...

...such as throwing monster wakes toward nearby fishing vessels.




Charlie W. got schoolies and blues on spin gear...





...and on the fly rod




This is what a mess of bluefish looks like on Mr. Garmin...

...in 34 feet of water...

...and the Long Island Sound water temperature at 63.2°F.




Some "eaters" in the livewell.




Gerry S. and I were into bluefish for a couple of hours out there.




Probably could have stayed the whole day on those fish...

...they were a lot of fun on light gear and took jigs, poppers, and flies as long as we stayed.


29 October 2012

• Satellite Image of Sandy at Noon on Monday



Image source: Wunderground.com


• HMS Bounty Abandoned in Face of Sandy


“Seventeen*** people from the replica HMS Bounty abandoned ship while stranded at sea off North Carolina in the path of Hurricane Sandy, the U.S. Coast Guard said on Monday....

“The three-masted, 180-foot (55-metre) vessel was believed to be taking on water and was without propulsion, stuck in 40 mile-per-hour winds and 18-foot (5.5-metre) seas, the Coast Guard said.”

Source: Courant.com

***Update to story: CoastGuardNews.com


• Coast Guard, Local Agencies Suspend Active Search For Milford Kayaker


The Coast Guard, along with local fire departments suspended their active search for a missing kayaker south of Charles Island near Milford, Conn., today.

Missing is 23-year-old Jett Kumweide, of Milford. He was last seen wearing a red t-shirt and jeans. He was not wearing a lifejacket.”

Source: CoastGuardNews.com


• “Two Kayaks Capsize Near Charles Island”


“According to reports, the two 21 year old male kayakers were not wearing life jackets at the time of the incident.”

Source: MilfordPatch.com


• Coastal Waters Forecast National Weather Service New York Ny 712 Am Edt Mon Oct 29 2012


Montauk Point New York To Sandy Hook New Jersey Out 20 Nm Offshore
Including Long Island Sound...Long Island Bays And New York Harbor
Long Island Sound West Of New Haven Ct/Port Jefferson Ny-
712 Am Edt Mon Oct 29 2012

Hurricane Force Wind Warning In Effect Through Tuesday Morning

TODAY
NE winds 25 to 35 kt with gusts up to 40 kt...increasing
To 35 to 45 kt with gusts up to 65 kt late this morning and
Afternoon. Seas 5 to 8 ft...building to 9 to 12 ft late this morning
And afternoon. Rain. Vsby 1 to 3 nm late this morning and afternoon.

TONIGHT
E winds 35 to 45 kt with gusts up to 75 kt...becoming se
25 to 35 kt with gusts up to 60 kt after midnight. Seas 9 to 12 ft...
Subsiding to 5 to 7 ft. Rain until early morning. Rain late. Vsby
1 to 3 nm.

TUE
Se winds 25 to 30 kt...becoming s 20 to 25 kt in the
Afternoon. Gusts up to 45 kt. Seas 5 to 7 ft...subsiding to 4 to
5 ft in the afternoon. Showers.

TUE NIGHT
SE winds 15 to 20 kt with gusts up to 30
Kt...becoming s 10 to 15 kt with gusts up to 20 kt after midnight.
Seas 2 to 4 ft. Showers likely.

WED
S winds 10 to 15 kt with gusts up to 25 kt. Seas 2 to 3 ft. A
Chance of showers.

Source: NOAA


• Long Island Sound, 0715, Monday 29 OCT



Winds at the Buoy on the western LIS now gusting to 35 kts.

Source: NDBC


• “Fly Casting Is Not Magic”



“As fly tackle changed, casting instructors began teaching the fly-casting stroke by relating it to the hands on a clock face. Thus was born a teaching concept that persists today.

”Most books, magazine articles, and videos teach that certain casting motions should be performed with reference to positions on a clock face. We believe this is a major reason why so many fly fishers are not better casters.

”We believe that if you can eliminate the casting stroke positions as related to a clock face, you can become a better caster.”

Source: FlyFisherman.com


28 October 2012

• Hurricane Sandy Forecast 1213 Sunday 28 OCT 2012


Long Island Sound West Of New Haven Ct/Port Jefferson NY-

HURRICANE FORCE WIND WARNING IN EFFECT FROM MONDAY MORNING
THROUGH TUESDAY MORNING

THIS AFTERNOON
NE WINDS 15 TO 20 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 30 KT. SEAS
2 TO 4 FT.

TONIGHT
NE WINDS 20 TO 25 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 35 KT...INCREASING
TO 25 TO 30 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 45 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. SEAS 4 TO
6 FT...BUILDING TO 5 TO 8 FT LATE.

MON
NE WINDS 30 TO 40 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 55 KT...INCREASING TO
40 TO 45 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 65 KT LATE. SEAS 9 TO 12 FT. RAIN.
VSBY 1 TO 3 NM.

MON NIGHT
E WINDS 40 TO 50 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 65 KT. SEAS 9 TO
14 FT...SUBSIDING TO 8 TO 11 FT AFTER MIDNIGHT. RAIN. VSBY 1 TO
3 NM.

TUE
SE WINDS 35 TO 40 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 55 KT...DIMINISHING TO
AROUND 30 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 45 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. SEAS 7 TO
10 FT...SUBSIDING TO 5 TO 8 FT IN THE AFTERNOON. RAIN...MAINLY IN
THE MORNING. VSBY 1 TO 3 NM.

TUE NIGHT
SE WINDS 25 TO 30 KT...BECOMING S 15 TO 20 KT AFTER
MIDNIGHT. SEAS 3 TO 5 FT. SHOWERS LIKELY. VSBY 1 TO 3 NM.

WED
SW WINDS 10 TO 15 KT. SEAS 2 TO 4 FT...SUBSIDING TO 1 TO
2 FT AFTER MIDNIGHT. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS.

THU
W WINDS 10 TO 15 KT. SEAS 2 TO 3 FT. ”

Source: NOAA


• Coast Guard Advice Re Hurricane Sandy


The Captain of the Port of Long Island Sound in New Haven, Conn., set port condition YANKEE in preparation for Hurricane Sandy, effective Saturday.

Gale force winds are expected to make landfall along the coast of Long Island Sound and Connecticut within 24 hours.

Mariners are also advised that drawbridges will remain closed when wind speeds are 34 knots or greater or once evacuations begin. Because of the uncertainty of weather movements and related bridge closures, mariners are urged to seek passage through drawbridges well in advance of the arrival of gale force winds.

Coast Guard small boat stations have begun moving their boats to a safe haven in anticipation of the hurricane. As a result, they will have minimal search and rescue capabilities until the storm passes out of the area. The Coast Guard once again urges boaters to stay off the water and away from the beaches.

Stay informed. The public should monitor the progress and strength of Hurricane Sandy through local television, radio and Internet. Boaters can monitor its progress on VHF radio channel 16. Information can also be obtained on small craft advisories and warnings on VHF radio channel 16.

For information about Long Island Sound’s port conditions visit: Long Island Sound Homeport.

For information on Hurricane Sandy’s progress and hurricane preparedness, please visit the National Hurricane Center’s web page.

For information about hurricane preparedness visit Ready.gov.

Source: CoastGuardNews.com


• CT DEEP Hearing to Discuss Filleting Striped Bass


“One of the proposals would allow fishermen to filet striped bass while on board vessels, provided the filets are at least 18 inches long and have the skin attached.
“…currently, striped bass must be filleted on shore to ensure they are of legal size….”

Source: TheDay.com


• NOAA: Winds to 65 Knots Still in Forecast for Sandy


Long Island Sound West Of New Haven CT/Port Jefferson NY-
800 AM EDT SUN OCT 28 2012

HURRICANE FORCE WIND WARNING IN EFFECT FROM MONDAY MORNING
THROUGH TUESDAY MORNING

TODAY
NE WINDS 20 TO 25 KT...DIMINISHING TO 15 TO 20 KT LATE THIS
MORNING AND AFTERNOON. SEAS 3 TO 5 FT. A SLIGHT CHANCE OF SHOWERS LATE THIS MORNING. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS THIS AFTERNOON.

TONIGHT
NE WINDS 20 TO 25 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 35 KT...INCREASING
TO 25 TO 30 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 45 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. SEAS 4 TO
6 FT. SHOWERS. VSBY 1 TO 3 NM AFTER MIDNIGHT.

MON
NE WINDS 30 TO 40 KT...INCREASING TO 40 TO 45 KT IN THE
AFTERNOON. GUSTS UP TO 60 KT. SEAS 4 TO 6 FT...BUILDING TO 5 TO
8 FT IN THE AFTERNOON. RAIN. VSBY 1 TO 3 NM.

MON NIGHT
E WINDS 40 TO 50 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 65 KT. SEAS 6 TO
9 FT. RAIN. VSBY 1 TO 3 NM.

TUE
SE WINDS 35 TO 40 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 55 KT...DIMINISHING TO
AROUND 30 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 45 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. SEAS 3 TO
5 FT. RAIN...MAINLY IN THE MORNING. VSBY 1 TO 3 NM.

TUE NIGHT
SE WINDS 25 TO 30 KT...BECOMING S 15 TO 20 KT AFTER
MIDNIGHT. SEAS 3 TO 5 FT. SHOWERS LIKELY. VSBY 1 TO 3 NM.

WED
SW WINDS 10 TO 15 KT. SEAS 2 TO 4 FT...SUBSIDING TO 1 TO
2 FT AFTER MIDNIGHT. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS.”

Source: NOAA


• “They Say You Should Write About What You Know…


“...and this advice has paid off handsomely for author C.J. Box.

”His best-selling novels, most of which feature crime-solving game warden Joe Pickett (who, like Box, is a Wyoming native, outdoorsman and dedicated family man), have sold millions of copies and won Box countless awards, including an Edgar Award in 2009, from the Mystery Writers of America, for Best Novel.

”Box and Pickett (who is once again the main character of Box’s newest work, Force of Nature, released this past March), share one other very important characteristic—both are avid fly fishermen.

”And while Pickett’s angling stories are fictitious, Box, in one of the few spare moments when he wasn’t either fishing or writing, agreed to share the truth behind his own fish tales.”

Source: FlyRodReel.com


27 October 2012

• NOAA Now Says Winds to 65 kts.



LONG ISLAND SOUND WEST OF NEW HAVEN CT/PORT JEFFERSON NY-
526 PM EDT SAT OCT 27 2012

HURRICANE FORCE WIND WATCH IN EFFECT FROM MONDAY MORNING THROUGH TUESDAY AFTERNOON

TONIGHT
NE WINDS 10 TO 15 KT. GUSTS UP TO 20 KT LATE THIS EVENING
AND OVERNIGHT. SEAS AROUND 2 FT. A SLIGHT CHANCE OF SHOWERS UNTIL
EARLY MORNING. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS LATE.

SUN
NE WINDS 15 TO 20 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 30 KT. SEAS 2 TO 3 FT.
A CHANCE OF SHOWERS.

SUN NIGHT
NE WINDS 20 TO 25 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 40 KT...
INCREASING TO 25 TO 30 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 45 KT LATE. SEAS 2 TO
4 FT. SHOWERS...MAINLY AFTER MIDNIGHT. VSBY 1 TO 3 NM.

MON
NE WINDS AROUND 30 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 50 KT...INCREASING TO
35 TO 45 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 60 KT IN THE LATE MORNING AND EARLY
AFTERNOON...THEN 65 KT TOWARD EVENING. SEAS 2 TO 4 FT...BUILDING
TO 5 TO 8 FT IN THE LATE MORNING AND AFTERNOON. RAIN. VSBY 1 TO 3
NM.

MON NIGHT
E WINDS 40 TO 50 KT. GUSTS UP TO 65 KT...DECREASING TO
55 KT LATE. SEAS 6 TO 9 FT...SUBSIDING TO 4 TO 7 FT LATE. RAIN. VSBY
1 TO 3 NM.

TUE
SE WINDS 35 TO 40 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 55 KT...DIMINISHING TO
AROUND 30 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 45 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. SEAS 3 TO
5 FT. RAIN...MAINLY IN THE MORNING. VSBY 1 TO 3 NM.

TUE NIGHT
SE WINDS 25 TO 30 KT...BECOMING S 15 TO 20 KT. SEAS
3 TO 5 FT...BUILDING TO 4 TO 7 FT LATE IN THE EVENING...THEN
SUBSIDING TO 3 TO 5 FT AFTER MIDNIGHT. SHOWERS LIKELY. VSBY 1 TO
3 NM.

WED
SW WINDS 10 TO 15 KT. SEAS 2 TO 4 FT. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS.

Source: NOAA


• New York Area Fishing Report


“Capt. Mike Boccio on his Prime Time III out at Orient, L.I., rates the blackfishing excellent on eastern Long Island Sound.

"For example, on Wednesday Jose Ramirez from Queens captured a pool-winning 11.6-pound blackfish from 60-foot of water near Mattituck, L.I.

"The skipper said that bluefishing is also good, but since the water is still a warmish 62 degrees the striped bass are somewhat spotty out that way."

Source: NYDailyNews.com


• NOAA Says Worst Winds Will Be 45 Knots



TODAY: E WINDS 5 TO 10 KT. SEAS 1 FT OR LESS.

TONIGHT: NE WINDS 10 TO 15 KT. SEAS AROUND 2 FT. A CHANCE OF
SHOWERS AFTER MIDNIGHT.

SUN: NE WINDS 15 TO 20 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 25 KT. SEAS 2 TO 4 FT.
A CHANCE OF RAIN.

SUN NIGHT: NE WINDS 20 TO 25 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 35 KT. SEAS 2 TO
4 FT. SHOWERS LIKELY IN THE EVENING...THEN RAIN AFTER MIDNIGHT. VSBY
1 TO 3 NM.

MON: NE WINDS 20 TO 25 KT...INCREASING TO 25 TO 30 KT IN THE
AFTERNOON. SEAS 2 TO 4 FT. RAIN. VSBY 1 TO 3 NM.

MON NIGHT: E WINDS 30 TO 35 KT WITH GUSTS UP TO 45 KT. SEAS 3 TO
5 FT. RAIN. VSBY 1 TO 3 NM.

TUE: E WINDS 30 TO 35 KT...BECOMING SE 15 TO 20 KT. SEAS 3 TO
5 FT. RAIN...MAINLY IN THE MORNING. VSBY 1 TO 3 NM.

WED: S WINDS 15 TO 20 KT...DIMINISHING TO 10 TO 15 KT IN THE
AFTERNOON...THEN BECOMING W. SEAS 3 TO 5 FT. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS.”

Source: NOAA


• Charles Walsh’s Fishing Column - 27 OCT 2012


“It was all but automatic.

"A hefty cast, two turns, three at the most, of the reel handle and sure as Bob's your uncle, the water under the plug erupted in a geyser of white foam. An angry bluefish, its spring-loaded jaws spread wide, fired clear out of the water.

"With no place to go in the shallow water, the fish had no choice but to go up. One, two, three, maybe six airborne leaps in all."

Source: CTPost.com


• Is Seafood Good for You?


“For every report that Omega 3 fatty acids are the fountain of youth, there’s another study warning seafood lovers about looming poison from excessive quantities of heavy metals, especially mercury.

”But are Omega 3s really that beneficial?

”And what to make of reports that selenium in fish can counterbalance the negative effects of mercury?

”And just what the hell is selenium, anyway?

”What’s the truth about fish?”

Source: AmericanProgress.org


26 October 2012

• CT DEEP Marine Fishing Report – 24 OCT 2012


Bluefish fishing has slowed down and Striped Bass fishing has gotten better.

However, bluefish weighing in the teens are still being reported! Stripers in the 40+ inch range are being caught by anglers live lining eels. Schoolies are now showing up in the tidal rivers.

Fishing spots include the usual locations: Watch Hill area, Ram Island Reef, Thames River, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, Little Gull Island, outer Bartlett Reef, off Black Point, the “humps” south of Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River, Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef including outer SW Reef, Six Mile Reef, the reefs off Madison, Guilford, and Branford, Falkner Island area, and New Haven Harbor.

Also Milford Harbor Jetties/Gulf Beach, Charles Island area, lower Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Penfield Reef, the reefs around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef.

Blackfish fishing is going strong on the local rock piles, reefs, and breakwaters. Fresh bait and sharp hooks are key for a successful trip.

Porgy fishing is good on the local reefs but time is waning!

Black Sea Bass fishing has also slowed down but is still doable.

Little Tunny and Atlantic Bonito are still around off Watch Hill and south shore of Fishers Island but it’s a crap shoot.

Source: CTDEEP


• First Critter On Earth to Have Teeth – Ancestor of Bluefish? You?


“Scientists have found fossil evidence of the first animal to grow a set of pearly whites — a prehistoric fish that lived more than 380 million years ago.

“An international research team discovered teeth in several specimens of an ancient fish species, known as placoderms, a finding that likely represents the origins of teeth and jaws in animals.

“A full set of chompers has been key to the success of most top predators….”

Source of article and photo: WAToday.com.au


25 October 2012

• Martha’s Vineyard Tournament Ends



“A total of 3,091 fishermen entered the 35-day contest that began on September 9.

”By its conclusion, they had caught and weighed in 1,144 bluefish, 226 bonito, 311 false albacore and 466 striped bass from shore and boat, using conventional tackle and fly tackle.”

Source: MVTimes.com


24 October 2012

• Housatonic River Dredging…2 More Articles


“In 1976, the last time the channel was dredged, 215,000 cubic yards of sand was removed from the floor of the Housatonic inlet; this was used to replenish Stratford's Short Beach. This time around, Long Beach will be the beneficiary of about 50,000 cubic yards of riverbottom sand."

Source: CTPost.com


• Housatonic River Dredging…More Information

"It's very important to dredge the river, because the river over the years has changed direction, changed shape, change locations because of the fact of the sediment that comes down 149 miles above here."

Source: WTNH.com


• Housatonic River Dredging Seen as Band-Aid



“About 50,000 cubic yards of sand, at a cost of $750,000, will be dredged from certain areas between the Route 1 bridge in Devon to the mouth of the river in Stratford.

”However, Milford and Stratford officials say $750,000 is just a drop in the bucket, and millions of dollars is needed to dredge the river properly.”

Source: NHRegister.com


23 October 2012

• Connecticut DEEP Seeks to Change Regs Related to Marine Sport Fishing


“The Commissioner of the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP), pursuant to sections 4-168 and 22a-6 of the Connecticut General Statutes, hereby gives notice of intent to amend and add to the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies. The proposed regulations pertain to sections: 26-142a - Commercial Fishing in the Inland and Marine Districts, 26-157b - Reports to the Commissioner, 26-157c – Taking of Lobsters, and 26-159a – Commercial and Sport Fishing in the Marine District.

”Copies of the proposed regulations, fiscal note, small business impact statement, and regulatory flexibility analysis can be obtained from the DEEP Marine Fisheries Division, 333 Ferry Road, PO Box 719, Old Lyme, CT 06371-0719, by calling 860-434-6043, by emailing deep.marine.fisheries@ct.gov, or by visiting the department’s website at www.ct.gov/deep/publicnotices.

”All interested parties are invited to present their views on the proposed amendments to the regulations at two public hearings to be held at: 7:00 PM, Monday, November 5, 2012; DEEP Marine Headquarters, Boating Education Center; 333 Ferry Road; Old Lyme, CT 06371

and

3:00 PM, Wednesday, November 7, 2012; Bridgeport Regional Aquaculture Science & Technology Center; 60 St. Stevens Road; Bridgeport, CT 06605.

”In addition to the public hearings, the DEEP Marine Fisheries Division will accept written comments for two weeks following the public hearings. Submit written comments to Mark Alexander by hand-delivery to the DEEP Marine Headquarters, by mail to the Marine Fisheries Division, PO Box 719, Old Lyme, CT 06371-0719, by email to deep.marine.fisheries@ct.gov, or by fax to 860-434-6150. Based on public comment, the proposed regulations may be adjusted to meet the objective of the proposal.”

Source: CTDEEP


• Other States to Join Connecticut in Terminating Salmon Restoration Program



“The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, which coordinated the restoration effort, decided during the summer to end its participation, citing poor progress.

”In recent days, the states of Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Connecticut also decided to end their complementary restoration efforts”

Source: Courant.com


• Stamford Area Fishing Report



“Last week was a good one for Connecticut anglers.

"We have received lots of reports of good bluefish, blackfish and false albacore angling plus two very nice walleye catches.”

Source: StamfordAdvocate.com


22 October 2012

• “The Surprising Sources of Your Favorite Seafoods”



“In 2011, Americans ate 15 pounds of fish and shellfish per person.

”While our seafood consumption still lags far behind that of poultry, pork, and beef, it does add up to nearly 5 billion pounds of seafood per year, making the United States second only to China in seafood consumption….”

Source: FishWatch.gov


21 October 2012

• “Inspecting Seafood: A Highly Trained Nose Knows”



“Do you know how we inspect seafood?

”How about the most common types of seafood fraud?

”We sat down with NOAA Fisheries Steve Wilson, Seafood Inspection Chief Quality Officer, to learn how his staff ensures seafood is safe and high-quality. Find out why a highly trained nose knows.”

Source: NOAA


20 October 2012

• Charles Walsh’s Fishing Column



Striped Bass or Bluefish?

"A big blue will take just as much line as a big bass, but the added excitement of watching them go airborne is what does it for me.

”I've only had a handful of bass go airborne, but most of the big blues do it repeatedly during the fight."

Source: CTPost.com


• “Are Humans Driving An Evolutionary Shift In Fish?



“We're essentially doing the classic selection experiment that agriculture does — but in reverse.

”Most people in agriculture would selectively breed bigger, faster-growing individuals, such as cows that produce more milk, or chickens that produce more eggs.

”But in a wild commercial fishery, we're tending to remove, selectively, the most productive individuals."

Source: TheAge.com.au


19 October 2012

• “Even As Winter Weather Approaches, Plenty Of Time To Get Some Fishing In”



“Hungry fish are eagerly feeding both inshore and offshore, as they prepare to migrate to winter territories.

"Water temps are now seasonable, too — lower 60s in Long Island Sound and upper 60s off Long Island's South Shore. But those striped bass and...."

Source: New York Daily News


• “A Fish Called Dinner"



"Striped bass, bluefish and false albacore were streaming south by the millions, chasing bait and water in a great annual migration that draws fishermen from all over New York and New England each fall, pilgrims to a fishing Mecca....”

Source: New York Times


• Connecticut DEEP Marine Fishing Report – 18 OCT 2012



Bluefish remain throughout LIS in big numbers. Bluefish sizes range from little harbors to monsters weighing in the mid to upper teens. Bluefish will be hanging out in coastal rivers, harbors, major reefs, and rip areas.

Striped Bass fishing has steadily improved with fish measuring in the high 40 inch range being reported caught in coastal rivers. Live lining bunker and eels continue to be very effective on large cow bass.

Striper spots include the reefs off Watch Hill, Ram Island Reef, Thames River, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, Little Gull Island, outer Bartlett Reef, off Black Point, the “humps” south of Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River, Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef including outer SW Reef, Six Mile Reef, the reefs off Madison, Guilford, and Branford, Falkner Island area, and New Haven Harbor.

Also Milford Harbor jetties/Gulf Beach, Charles Island area, lower Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Penfield Reef, the reefs around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef.

Porgy fishing is still very good on the local reefs.

Black Sea Bass fishing has diminished slightly but is still good. Humpheads measuring up to 24 inches are still being reported caught by anglers.

Blackfish fishing season is now open and fishing is red hot! Togs are in close to shore in shallow water rocky areas, reefs, and breakwaters. Right now, shore anglers can catch some nice blackfish at any of our coastal state parks such as Sherwood Island, Rocky Neck, and Harkness Memorial.

Little Tunny and Atlantic Bonito are still around off Watch Hill, Wilderness Point, Bluff Point, Pine Island area, and the Race including Little Gull Island to the Sluiceway.

Source: CTDEEP


• Housatonic River Dredging Set For End Of Month



"It will take about a month to move 50000 cubic yards of silt and deepen the channel in the Housatonic River…

”Three areas in the channel between Stratford and Milford will be dredged: the mouth of the river, beyond the breakwater; at the bend across from the Birdseye boat launch; the bend from navigation buoy 19 to just south of the Washington Bridge into Devon, buoy 23.”

Source: StratfordStar.com


• Time To Go Surfcasting Again


“The stretch from mid-October to mid-November is prime time for Long Island's surfcasters.

"But while the fishing can be explosive, it can also be frustrating for novice anglers.

”Tackle choices need to be tweaked, lures have to match predominant baitfish, and the fish can appear anywhere….”

Source: Newsday.com


18 October 2012

• Norwalk Area Fishing Report



“Bluefish action also continues to be strong. Blues crashed the bunker schools inside the harbor on Saturday.

”Chunkers are still doing well at Buoys 11B and 28C and 11B is still producing on the diamond jigs too. Bass are mixing with the blues at that location.”

Source: TheHour.com


• “Striped Bass Reproduction Hits Record Low”



“Decline blamed on weather; no catch restrictions planned…

"The number of young striped bass in the Chesapeake Bay fell to a record low this year, a drastic decline from a near-record high the year before, state officials reported Tuesday.

"State biologists checking Maryland's part of the bay found the fewest newly spawned striped bass that they've tallied in any year since annual surveys for the fish began 59 years ago, the Department of Natural Resources reported.”

Source: BaltimoreSun.com


17 October 2012

• How to Set Up a 2-Fly Rig



I mentioned recently about catching two schoolie stripers on one cast by using a 2-fly rig.

One of our erstwhile readers was intrigued enough about this to inquire how this can be done.

There are probably several ways to do it...but the bottom line is that you have to end up with two pieces of mono or fluorocarbon hanging off the end of your leader. The most traditional method is to create a "dropper loop" in your leader and then tie a section of mono/fluoro to that. This will work just fine; however, I'd like to show you two other approaches:


ALBRIGHT KNOT

In this first method, you take a section of mono/fluoro about 24 inches [61 cm] long and fold it in half [shown by the multi-colored line in this photo].

Then you come in with your leader [solid white] and combine the two with an "Albright Knot."

Note that the hot links for the knots will take you to AnimatedKnots.com where there are full instructions and amazing pix of how to tie the knots.

You clip off the extra piece of leader on the left and then clip one of the two sections of mono/fluoro shorter than the other, depending on how far apart you want your two flies to be, and then tie on the flies.



SURGEON'S KNOT OR J-KNOT

In this method you tie in a section of mono/fluoro using a "surgeon's knot" and leave a length of leader extending below the knot next to the tied-in piece of mono/fluoro; then tie a fly to each of these.

Nice thing about this method is that it allows you to use two different tests of material which may help in getting the flies to separate more in the water.

Instead of the surgeon's knot, I prefer to use the "J-Knot." It's tougher and gives a greater feeling of security...at least to me.



So the result is two flies at the end of your fly line.

I like to use a Clouser Minnow [weighted] on the longer section of mono/fluoro and a Lefty's Deceiver [unweighted] on the shorter end. This allows the Clouser to hang lower in the water and stay separated from the unweighted fly.

Any questions, let me know.

p.s. This will also work with spinning gear; you can use a weighted jig on the bottom and a lighter lure above.

p.p.s. Casting a 2-fly rig is a bit more taxing than a single-fly outfit...but the extra hits may be worth the effort.

16 October 2012

• Connecticut, Long Island Sound, Housatonic River Saltwater Fishing Report: 13 OCT 2012



Sorry, but have been a bit lazy about posting trip reports to the blog.

It's been a mixed bag weather-wise...a lot of hiding out from the wind and dodging the rain.




Still, there have been some glorious sunrises...even when reflected in the condo windows...




...or when seen over the bow of a sailboat.




All the usual lunkheads have been out...racing through the no-wake zone.




We explained to this gentleman that he was supposed to be wearing a life vest, but...to no apparent avail.




Despite the dodgy weather, we've gotten into fish each trip...here's Val S. fighting a schoolie.




We gave this tug and barge the "right of way" as she was restricted in maneuverability...and a lot bigger than we were.


I think Charlie W. was fighting a bluefish in this shot.

Whereas a few weeks ago we were landing 10-15 blues for every striper, it's now reversed...more bass than blues.

Water temp was 64° on the 13th, so some bluefish will be with us for a while yet.



Finally remembered to take a photo of a caught fish...schoolie striper...fun on light gear.

I was using a 2-fly rig on Saturday and caught schoolies two-at-a-time on six casts. Funny thing was, when we tried 1-fly setups, we went hitless!





The color of the marsh grass is outstanding this time of year.

15 October 2012

• Charles Walsh’s Fishing Column



“Blackfish season opened Wednesday with a splash.

"Actually, it was lots of splashes as just about anyone willing to brave the cold wind and choppy seas found the tautog pickings spectacular.

Source: CTPost.com


14 October 2012

• Big Stamford Sewage Spill Threatens Long Island Sound


“Fire and health department officials are trying to figure out how to deal with a large sewage spill on the East Branch of Stamford Harbor.

”The spill appears too large to contain and when the tide turns, the floating, stinking mounds of effluent will be swept into the Sound….”

Source: CTPost.com


• Narragansett Fisherman Takes Striper Cup



On The Water magazine celebrated the end of its five-month-long Striper Cup fishing tournament at Striper Fest, held Saturday, September 29 at Marine Park on Falmouth Harbor, MA.

"Over 4,000 people attended the event and thousands of fishermen from New Jersey to Maine participated in the competition. It was a Rhode Island fisherman who claimed "Striper of the Year" honors.

”Barry Centracchio of Narragansett, Rhode Island weighed in the largest striped bass in the tournament….”

Source: CranstonOnLine.com


12 October 2012

• Connecticut DEEP Marine Fishing Report – 11 OCT 2012



Bluefish are throughout LIS and fishing is about peak and remains excellent. There are “Gator-sized Blues” to 16 pounds being reported every day. This is prime time for surf anglers to hook up with some monster choppers roaming along the Connecticut shoreline. Please note: there are schools of adult Bunker throughout the Sound and lower rivers/estuaries…so the feeding frenzy is on!

Striped Bass fishing is challenging with all of the bluefish around. However, fishing continues to improve on the local reefs and tidal rips as water temperatures cool. Many large “Cow Bass” to 57 pounds have been weighed in while fishing the approaching New Moon. Dusk through dawn is your best chance at scoring with large cow bass. However, daytime/late afternoon fishing is getting better by the day. Live lining bunker or eels on three way or fish finder (slip sinker) rigs is the ticket.

The usual spots include the reefs off Watch Hill, Ram Island Reef, Thames River, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, Little Gull Island, outer Bartlett Reef, off Black Point, the “humps” south of Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River, Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef including outer SW Reef, Six Mile Reef, the reefs off Madison, Guilford, and Branford, Falkner Island area.

Also New Haven Harbor, Milford Harbor jetties/Gulf Beach, Charles Island area, lower Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Penfield Reef, the reefs around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef.

A reminder to anglers…Circle hooks reduce “gut hooking” and most of the time the hook lodges just in the corner of the fish’s mouth for an easy release…an excellent conservation tool which can provide for years of great fishing.

Blackfish fishing season opened on October 10th. The daily creel limit is 4 fish and the minimum length limit is 16 inches. Green crabs, hermit crabs, and Asian shore crabs are preferred baits for hooking these hard fighting “Reef Bullies”. Weighted jigs in white or chartreuse with bait are very effective. Any rock pile/gnarly hard bottom or wreck is perfect tog habitat. Smaller rock piles or structure in shallow water (8’- 15’) produce larger-sized fish early in the fall fishing season. One must be willing to move from reef to reef and be patient while fishing for these wonderful good eating fish. Please be considerate of other anglers and their boats…so everyone can enjoy this great fishery resource.

Porgy fishing is also excellent for these “Reef Slammers” on any local reef and or rock pile throughout Long Island Sound. The time to go is now! Fish in excess of 18 inches in length and four pounds have been caught. Most of the rocky reefs and wrecks throughout LIS will harbor scup. Porgies are a great fish to introduce children to some exciting ”Deep Sea” fishing with the family and or friends! Our coastal state parks are definitely worth trying out! Go to our web site at http://www.depdata.ct.gov/maps/marinefish/fishmap.htm to find fishing locations close to home. Squid, sand worms, conch and small crabs are the bait of choice.

Black Sea Bass fishing is dynamite…very good. “Bucketmouths” of 26 inches and 7 pounds have been reported. The best time for catching humpbacks is around slack tide. For those anglers willing to venture further, Block Island Sound has been red hot! Locate hard (gravel/rock/boulder) bottom in deep water (80 to 130 feet). Clams are the bait of choice along with crabs. Use braided line to feel the bites along with 8 -12 ounces of weight (or a weighted jig) on a tandem rig.

Little Tunny and Atlantic Bonito fishing has been awesome for ”Albies”, or “Hard Tails”, as they feed heavily on Atlantic silversides before migrating south. These small tuna can be found cruising around in Fishers Island Sound, Watch Hill to Wilderness Point, Bluff Point, Pine Island area off the mouth of the Thames River, the Race including Little Gull Island, Bartlett Reef, Harkness Memorial State Park, Jordan Cove to Millstone Point, and the Black Point area. The Western Sound has also enjoyed the fun with these spectacular fish, with anglers reporting good numbers from Fairfield to Norwalk. Artificial lures are the bait of choice.

Fluke fishing is slow with few “Doormats” being captured.

Blue Claw Crabbing has slowed down to pretty much a stop. Some “Jimmies” still hangin around.”

Source: CTDEEP


• Norwalk Area Fishing Report



“We checked in with Nick at Fisherman's World where Albies are still causing excitement. Jason Saunders and John Poly found them on Cockenoe Reef on Saturday and scored on Deadly Dick lures. Ian Devlin also connected with these fast movers on the back side of the Islands in 20 to 40 feet of water.

”Bluefish continue to be the main menu with Buoy 28C, Buoy 11B and Green's Ledge the hottest area hotspots. Be sure to carry a spinning stick and some popping plugs along with jigging gear when you head across to 11B. Most of the time, the jigs pay off, but the blues also come to the surface on occasion bringing the fun that goes along with catching them on top.”

Source: TheHour.com


• Trout Season Could Open 01 APR in 2013

This post is from October 2012. For the latest information, click here: Update on 2013 Trout season


“"It seems to me we're missing out on capturing some revenue. We've got one of the largest fish hatcheries in the Northeastern United States in Plainfield, and it's sort of silly we're the last out of the gate in the contiguous surrounding states...

”… one of the biggest hurdles in changing opening day is ensuring that all locations are fully stocked before fishing season begins.”

Source: CTPost.com


11 October 2012

• “Connecticut Officials Consider Mute Swans an Invasive Species”



“The large, white birds might look graceful and elegant floating in New Haven Harbor in a group of 50 to 75, but they’re on the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection’s radar and not for a good reason.

"The mute swans are considered invasive species with the potential to edge out native birds, fish and scallops in the areas they’ve overtaken….”

Source: CountyTimes.com


• No Mycobacteriosis in Boston/Cape Cod/MV Striped Bass



“Test results on skin lesions found on striped bass caught in some areas of the Cape, Martha's Vineyard and Boston Harbor this summer did not show any signs of mycobacteriosis, the state Division of Marine Fisheries announced Friday.”

Source: CapeCodTimes.com


10 October 2012

• Invasive Lionfish: Such A Problem that NOAA Has a Publication on How to Control Them



“’Invasive lionfish pose a clear and present threat to coastal marine ecosystems and fisheries of the tropical Western Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico,’ said Mark Hixon, Ph.D., a prominent coral reef ecologist of Oregon State University. ‘This new guide is a comprehensive compendium of up-to-date information for understanding and effectively addressing this worst of marine invasions.’

“’Specific impacts of lionfish include consumption of ecologically important species such as algae eaters that keep algae in check on coral reefs. On heavily invaded reefs, lionfish are also capable of removing more than 60 percent of prey fish, some of which include economically important species like snapper and grouper.”

Source: NOAA


• Ricocheted Bullet Hits Man Trying To Hunt Salmon With Rifle


Note: this post is from October 2012; for the latest news, please see: ConnecticutSaltwaterFishing.com

“The 51-year-old man tried to use a .22 caliber rifle to fish in the Deschutes River near Tumwater on Sunday, authorities said.”

Source: KIROTV.com


• More on Atlantic Salmon Broodstock Release in the Naugatuck River



“Atlantic salmon broodstock stocked in the Shetucket and Naugatuck rivers are typically released into three designated Atlantic Salmon Broodstock Areas:

"Between Scotland Dam (Scotland) and Occum Dam (Norwich) on the Shetucket River;

"...the "Campville Section" of the upper Naugatuck River from Route 118 downstream to the Thomaston Flood Control Dam (Litchfield-Thomaston);

"...and the "Beacon Falls Section" of the lower Naugatuck from Prospect Street (Naugatuck) downstream to Pines Bridge Road (Route 42 bridge, Beacon Falls).

"Anglers are allowed to fish for salmon in the Naugatuck River from the confluence of the East and West Branches (Torrington) downstream to the Housatonic River (Derby). Anglers may also fish for Atlantic salmon in the Housatonic River downstream of Derby Dam.”

Source: StamfordAdvocate.com


• Connecticut Sees Worst West Nile Season Ever



“Connecticut got off relatively easy, particularly since there have been no West Nile deaths here this year.

"But the state still broke its own record for human cases, said Dr. Theodore G. Andreadis, chief medical entomologist for the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.

”The station traps and tests mosquitoes for West Nile virus throughout the season.”

Source: NorwalkCitizenOnLine.com


• USDHHS: ”Everyone 6 Months of Age and Older Should Get the Flu Vaccine”



The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services provides a video on protecting yourself from the flu.

Also, use the HHS Flu Vaccine Finder to find a flu vaccine location near you.

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services


• Is Block Island “At the Center Of The Worst Shark Territory In the Entire World?



“In early summer of 1960, after chumming with chunks of a 3,000-pound blackfish whale he had brought back to shore the day before, Mundus caught a great white shark just four miles off the Amagansett beach, right next to Montauk.

"He threw four harpoons in the course of an hour, with the shark succumbing after towing four barrels through the water.

”The 3,000-pound shark was displayed in Montauk, attracting the public, as well as reporters.

”Sound vaguely like a movie plot?”

Source: Block-Island.Villagesoup.com


09 October 2012

• Want To Land A Record Goldfish? Go to Maine!



“In the past two years, DIF&W scientists have “reclaimed” 11 ponds from goldfish infestations. Two more — Birdsacre and a pond in Mount Desert — are slated for reclamation within the next two years.

”Reclamation is achieved by dispersing rotenone, a naturally occurring piscicide that’s found in several beans and legumes in South America. DIF&W crews don hip-waders and spray the chemical into the infested water. Over the next few weeks, all the fish in the water are dead.”

Source: BangorDailyNews.com


• Coast Guard Advises Safe Boating As Cooling Weather Arrives



“The Coast Guard advises practicing safe boating as cooling weather and sea conditions in the fall season pose many challenges and dangers for boaters in the Northeast.

”The greatest defense against the seasonal changes is to prepare for them, be familiar with the waters you operate in and make boating safety a life practice.

”From September to late November, water temperatures can drop nearly 30 degrees Fahrenheit and air temperature cools significantly. These changing conditions increase the danger of hypothermia for all boaters and paddlers.”

Source: Coast Guard News


• “Smaller Fleet, Fewer Fish, But After 300 Years Fishing Still Defines Chatham,” MA



“And although the industry has changed drastically in the last 300 years, there is a growing movement to make sure that intimate connection between townspeople and the ocean doesn’t change.

”Eldredge doesn’t expect folks to eat fish three times a day, but hopes they realize their neighbors, and fishermen up and down the Cape, are still going to sea and coming home with what they caught, much like they did centuries ago.”

Source: WickedLocal.com/Provincetown


08 October 2012

• Paying Tourists A Bounty to Collect Starfish May Not Be That Great An Idea



"Maybe the first one to pick one up and get stung will be a bit of an attraction for everyone to look at how bad his arm or leg swells up...but it's not something that tourists are typically interested in….”

Source: ABC.net.au


• Report Reviews Economic Development Potential for Connecticut Deep Water Ports



“…the Connecticut Deep Water Port Strategy Study which was commissioned by Connecticut's Department of Transportation (DOT) to guide the development of a long-term economic development strategy for the deep water ports in Bridgeport, New Haven, and New London.

"The study makes recommendations to protect existing commercial operations at these ports, and identifies new opportunities for business growth.”

Source: State of Connecticut


• Estuaries—NOAA’s Habitat of the Month



“What do you call the place where fresh water meets salt water?

”It’s an estuary!

”Estuaries are where fresh water from rivers mixes with salt water from the ocean. These transitional areas that straddle the land and sea contain habitats needed by fish, shellfish, wildlife—and people.

”Although the word isn’t in their names, Puget Sound, Tampa Bay, Elkhorn Slough, Cook Inlet, and the lower Hudson River are all estuaries.”

Source: NOAA

The lower Housatonic, Connecticut, and Thames Rivers are also estuaries.