31 July 2012

• Eels: Solution to Striped Bass Dog Days



”Hope you're not afraid of snakes.

”Summer's hot-water fishing doldrums are upon us, a little earlier than usual, and the best cure for warm-water-induced striper lockjaw is a bucketful of wriggling foot-and-a-half-long eels.”

Source: BostonHerald.com


• Zebra Mussel Juveniles Advance Down Housatonic River



”Zebra mussel veligers -- the tiny, nymphal stage of the highly invasive, non-native mussel -- have been found in the Housatonic River near the Rocky River hydroelectric power plant.

”However, they have yet to be found in Candlewood Lake -- the lake that the Rocky River plant regulates by pumping in water from the Housatonic.”

Source: NewsTimes.com


30 July 2012

• Stratford-on-Housatonic



Can this be the start of an actual revival?

”…it may be just a rumor that mushrooms have been growing in the building's cellar, there are holes in the roof and volunteers have already hauled away 30 tons of garbage.

"On the positive side, tours have been organized, an exhibit of memorabilia is being planned and Catalano remains undeterred. 'I am absolutely certain,' he said, 'that people will come from all over to a place called Stratford.'


"Romeo and Juliet is on the grounds of the American Shakespeare Festival, 1859 Elm St., Stratford, Aug. 1-5. Call (203) 393-3213 or visit www.connecticutfreeshakespeare.org.”

Source: TheHour.com


• How to Use the Reel’s Drag for Stripers and Bluefish



”Understanding how to set and use the drag on one's reel is one of the most important aspects of saltwater fishing.

”The drag on a reel does two things:

”It applies pressure to a fish and it keeps the line from breaking by allowing it to slip before snapping.”

Source: DelMarVaNow.com


29 July 2012

• 2012 Greatest Bluefish Tournament



”It's almost time for the Annual WICC 600 Greatest Bluefish Tournament on Earth. The 2012 edition of this popular fishing contest will be held the weekend of August 25-26.

“As in the past, the prize for the heaviest fish caught by a registered angler during the tourney is $25,000….”

Source: Martin Armstrong in StamfordAdvocate.com


• Dams: How Industrial Age Technology is Costing Us



”Thousands of dams—many more than a century old—block the natural flow of our rivers. That's well past the productive lifespan of many of these structures.

”Beginning in the 18th century, dams were built to power mills producing cloth, flour, and other goods. With the mills gone, the dams no longer play the role they once did. But after all these years, the dams are still impacting the rivers.

”Millions of fish that migrate annually between the ocean and rivers can't get to their native spawning grounds, contributing to drastic reductions in the populations. This affects the entire ecosystem since they are important prey for other animals, both on land and at sea.

”Dams that ‘breach’ (rupture) also pose a significant threat to human life and property. To prevent this, dams require regular maintenance, which can be costly. Removing dams can be a boon to fish and a relief to local residents.”

Source: NOAA


28 July 2012

• Charles Walsh: Blue Crabs, and A 41-Pound Striper



”For many people, eating blue-claw crabs is just too much trouble.

"Who needs the tedium of nutcrackering barely a forkful of meat out of those rock-hard claws, they ask. Why hunt through all that connective tissue in the body for the small disc of crabmeat -- delectable as it is -- that hides in there?

“Oh ye of the impoverished palate, repent….”

Source: Charles Walsh in CTPost.com

Note: Be sure to read the sidebar.



• Connecticut DEEP Saltwater Fishing Report - 26 JUL 2012



Striped Bass and Bluefish fishing is good at the following areas: The Watch Hill reefs, lower Thames River, the Race, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, Little Gull Island, outer Bartlett Reef, Black Point, Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River, Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef including outer SW Reef, Six Mile Reef, the reefs off Madison to Branford, Falkner Island area, and New Haven Harbor (including Sandy Point).

Also, Charles Island area, Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Penfield Reef, around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef.

Snapper Bluefish fishing remains good to excellent in the tidal rivers and creeks.

Fluke fishing has really slowed down and is rated just fair to good. Deeper water (90-plus feett) appears to be your best bet for hooking a doormat.

Porgy fishing is good to excellent on the major reefs. Fish measuring 17 inches in length have been reported.

Black Sea Bass fishing around slack tide over hard rocky bottom and wrecks in deep water is your best bet in Long Island Sound. On the other hand, Block Island Sound has been red hot.

Source: CTDEEP


• Coast Guard, Navy, Costa Rican Coast Guard team interdict $4 million marijuana shipment



”After visual and radio signaling were ignored, the precision marksman fired warning shots. The go-fast stopped, and the persons aboard put their hands up.

"A Costa Rican Coast Guard vessel came alongside and took custody of the suspected smugglers and their vessel.

"The Elrod’s helicopter crew then located a debris field of jettisoned packets of various sizes. A Coast Guard boarding team aboard the Elrod’s small boat was then launched and recovered 91 bales of marijuana.”

CoastGuardNews.com


27 July 2012

• Ask Lefty: Not Hooking Up with Poppers



”Recently, I have missed a number of strikes on poppers when I thought I should have gotten a hookup. Any suggestions?”

Source: Fly Fishing in Salt Waters


• Eastern Long Island Sound Fishing Report



”Bluefish have been around since May and continue to provide for excellent fishing along the coast.

”…snapper blues are also around in above-average numbers. Anglers are catching them from the usual bridges, trestles and docks throughout the area.

”Striped bass, for the most part, have migrated north in search of cooler waters.”

Source: Bob Sampson in NorwichBulletin.com


• Tying the Striper Slammer



”Add a visual element to shallow-water bassing with this popper....”

Source: View Video


25 July 2012

Connecticut, Long Island Sound, Housatonic River Saltwater Fishing Report: 25 JUL 2012



Sunrise, 25 JUL 2012





Rich N., proprietor of Newtown Bait & Tackle, Newtown, CT, joined me for this trip and was quickly into the biggest fish of the day.





Pulled the scale down to 13 pounds.





A face only a mother...or a fisherman...could love.





The "no-wake zones don't apply to me lunkhead of the day.





Some agency is taking scientific measurements of some sort at the mouth of the Housatonic River.





Capt. also got into a nice bluefish.





Scrappy critter didn't like to see the boat.





A nine-pounder...second-biggest fish of the day.


• Fly Casting: How to Groove Your Cast [2]



Don't Use So Much Force, Luke:

Casting instructors say the No. 1 casting flaw is overpowering. It's a natural impulse to push harder when you need the line to go farther, or when you're excited by the presence of feeding fish and rush to get a fly in front of them. But too much force will degrade your cast. Casting with a decidedly light touch can make an amazing difference.

As they say, let the rod and line do the work. Both are products of decades of fly-fishing experience, meticulously designed for top performance. Use a light touch so you can take advantage of that design expertise.”

Source: This and other ideas on how to groove your cast can be found in the most recent newsletter from Flyshack.com. To receive this newsletter, go to Fly Shack Newsletter


• Striped Bass and Mycobacteriosis


”Saltwater anglers are concerned about handling striped bass that have lesions on them and MarineFisheries has received several reports of skin lesions on stripers, the general condition being red spotting visible along the sides of the fish, resembling open skin ulcers.

”A major concern is that lesions such as these can be indicative of the presence of the disease Mycobacteriosis, which is common in southern waters, especially Chesapeake Bay, but has not yet been documented in Massachusetts waters.”

Source: SouthCoastToday.com


• Striped Bass and Bluefish During Summer’s Dog Days



”I've been asked to report on stripers and why they are so hard to find right now…

”The big fish seem to be feeding at night when the waters are calmer and there is less boat traffic, just like their smaller cousins, the largemouth and smallmouth bass found in our lakes and ponds.

"It happens every August when the "dog days of summer" arrive. You can set your watch on it as the dogfish (sharks) arrive in numbers, the hot steamy days are followed by warm nights and the humidity…. All of these combine to send the big stripers down deep where it is cooler and calmer.

”If you just prefer stripers, try some night fishing off of the many bridges….

”However, if fishing is your game and you just want action, the bluefish are more than willing to hit everything you throw if you don't mind searching for them….”

Source: SeaCoastOnLine.com


24 July 2012

• Snoozers Are Losers in Summer Quest for Striped Bass



”In summertime fishing, the early bird gets the worm, or more accurately, the early worm gets the striper.

”By late July and into August, you can often catch more during the magical time between “first light” and sunrise than most folks catch all day. By the time the sun rises above the horizon and boat traffic picks up, bait and bass go sulk in the deep.

”So it’s worth losing some sleep to get to the ramp under the cover of darkness….”

Source: BostonHerald.com


• June global temperatures fourth highest on record



”The globally-averaged temperature for June 2012 marked the fourth warmest June since record keeping began in 1880.

"It also marks the 36th consecutive June and 328th consecutive month with a global temperature above the 20th century average.”

NOAA


23 July 2012

• Striped Bass: Artificial Bait Works Too!




”When the majority of both boat and shore saltwater anglers target stripers and or bluefish, they are usually thinking bait, without giving much attention to artificial baits and lures.

”In times when live bait such as mackerel and pollock become scarce or hard to catch, hour upon hour are often spent in frustration trying to get enough bait to go after the game fish. But a small minority “in the know’’ will not waste that time but will immediately target their stripers and bluefish with artificial baits and lures.”

Source: UnionLeader.com


• Coast Guard: Hoax Maydays Expensive and Dangerous



Note: this article is from July 2012. For the latest reports please go to: ConnecticutSalwaterFishing.com

”The Coast Guard is calling attention to the dangers and risks of hoax distress calls after launching air and boat crews to respond to a radio transition of a child’s voice making a mayday call Saturday at approximately 6:46 p.m.

”Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Southeastern New England’s command center received the call….

”False alerts and hoax calls are particularly frustrating cases for both the maritime emergency responders and taxpayers. These cases unnecessarily put first responders in danger and waste valuable operational hours and cost.

"The total search efforts associated with this call will be well over $20,000, $10,000 for one hour of helicopter search time and $3,000 each hour per small boat.”

CoastGuardNews.com


22 July 2012

• Rescued Cat Was Wearing Life Jacket***



The Line Item, which had six people aboard, started taking on water quickly and began sinking. A boatcrew from Station Indian River arrived on scene and rescued the six people aboard with no injuries.

"The crew of the 87-foot Coast Guard Cutter Ibis, homeported in Cape May, N.J., arrived on scene, deployed their smallboat, and rescued two people and one cat, all wearing life jackets, from the Obsession. No injuries were reported.”

CoastGuardNews.com

***Thereby proving that the cat had more common sense than many boaters.

Photo not related to story


21 July 2012

Connecticut, Long Island Sound, Housatonic River Saltwater Fishing Report: 19 JUL



Charlie W. and I were underway shortly after 0600 on Thursday.

First thing we saw on the river was a pod of bunker finning on the surface.

That line of wrinkled water is the fish.



Thursday was the day after the thermometers broke 100° in many parts of Connecticut...but Thursday was not like Wednesday.

It was chilly and sunless at the start of the day.

The local commercial fishing fleet was undaunted, however, and headed out on Long Island Sound.



The winds were whipping in from the east at 15-20 as the sun sought to get out from behind the clouds.

We endured a couple of brief, light showers and a couple of glimpses of the sun's rays...which were warming but short-lived.



Camera froze this bird's props in space as it approached the airport.



It felt more like October out there than it did like 19 July.


The beam of Stratford light was clearly visible through the gloom.


Of course, cloud cover is not all bad. Leaden skies would keep the fish inshore whereas bright sun would have them heading for the depths.

But with the water temps on the Sound nearing or even exceeding 70°, stripers were going to be hard to find in shallow water.



That east wind, blowing the whole length of Long Island Sound, made it too rough to venture out comfortably, so we spent most of the time hunkered down behind a seawall.



We were looking for striped bass and blues, but caught only bluefish...

...which doesn't really bother me as bluefish are among the best fighting fish in the Sound.

This fellow ran line off the reel and jumped a couple of times before finally succumbing to the boga grip.



These terns, probably Common Terns, were all lined up facing into the wind.

Guess it's easier for them to stand that way under blowing conditions, plus it sets them up to take off in case the nasty man in the boat with the camera decides to attack.



We caught a bunch of bluefish...kept three for the filet knife which Charlie wields with expertise.

Could have used a warmer jacket out there, but all-in-all it was another great day on the water.

• Missing Swimmer Off Short Beach, Stratford, CT?



”A search has been called off for a man who was believed missing in the water off Short Beach, near the mouth of the Housatonic River in Long Island Sound, a Coast Guard spokesman said.

”The search began after a person reported seeing someone swimming but not return….”

Source: StamfordAdvocate.com


20 July 2012

• Charles Walsh’s Fishing Report



”The boat slowed as we neared a dining room table-sized oval of dark ripples, a giveaway that bunker -- menhaden, if you prefer -- were swirling just under the surface.

"We grabbed our rods that were rigged with four-inch plastic shad and prepared to cast in case something bigger lurked below.”

Source: Charles Walsh in CTPost.com

Photo: See that narrow band of shaky water? That's a school of bunker...near the surface.

Click on photo to enlarge.


∙ The Weekend: “The Hidden Costs of Cheap Lobsters"



”It’s a good time to be a tourist in Maine. While the rest of the country is being ravaged by wildfires, sweltering away setting record numbers of record-high temperatures, or withering in the grasp of a drought that rivals the 1930s Dust Bowl, northern New England’s temperate climes are a welcome relief. And the cherry on top of that cool, soothing sundae is that the state’s signature seafood, lobster, is selling at rock-bottom prices—as little as $3.99 per pound in Portland.

”The downside, of course, is that while epicures can sample their favorite crustaceans for less than they typically pay for bologna, most lobstermen are struggling to just break even at per-pound prices as low as $2—about half what they typically receive for their catch.”

Source: AmericanProgress.org


• Connecticut Saltwater Fishing Report



Striped Bass: Fishing remains good during after dark hours. The usual striper haunts include the Watch Hill reefs, lower Thames River, the Race, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, Little Gull Island, outer Bartlett Reef, Black Point, Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River, Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef (outer), Six Mile Reef, the reefs off Madison to Branford, Falkner Island area, and New Haven Harbor (including Sandy Point).

Also, Charles Island area, Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Penfield Reef, around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef. Live lining bunker, scup, or eels on three-way rigs is the way to go!

Bluefish: Good throughout LIS. The Race, Pigeon Rip, Plum Gut, Madison and Branford Reefs, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground have been consistent spots. In the tidal rivers and harbors, look for bunker schools on the water surface making a commotion. This is a dead give-a-way bluefish are around.

Snapper Bluefish: Good to excellent in the tidal rivers and creeks. Snappers are about 4 to 6 inches long.

Fluke: Fishing has slowed down and is rated fair to good, although some doormats weighing in from 5 to 7 lbs have been reported over this past week. Fluke spots include Fishers Island (Isabella Beach, Wilderness Point), off the Stonington breakwater, mouth of the Mystic River to Groton Long Point, Thames River channel, Two Tree Island Channel, Black Point/Niantic Bay, Long Sand Shoal, Westbrook-Clinton area, Falkner Island area, outer New Haven Harbor, and off the mouth off the Housatonic River.

Porgy: Good to excellent on the major reefs and rock piles. Fish measuring 13 to 15 inches are not unusual.

Black Sea Bass: Good on the reefs and wrecks in deep water (90+ ft.). Fishing around slack tide is best.

Hickory Shad: Hit or miss in the lower Connecticut River from Baldwin Bridge to Great Island.


Inshore tuna (Atlantic Bonito and Little Tunny) have showed up early in eastern LIS (Watch Hill area, south shore of Fishers Island) and Block Island Sound.

Blue Crabbing remains good in the tidal creeks of Stonington to Mystic, Thames River, and tidal creeks and coves in Niantic to Old Lyme and Westbrook to Guilford.

CTDEEP


• Eastern Long Island Sound Fishing Report



”The summer heat is already bringing in some of the warm water-loving species that don’t usually come around until August.

"Captain Jack Balint, of the Fish Connection, caught his first bonito of the year while chasing a school of bluefish off the Misquamicut Beach area of Rhode Island.

Bob Sampson in NorwichBulletin.com


19 July 2012

• Patch Can Prevent Misery of Sea Sickness



”I went saltwater fishing for the first time back in 1991 on a party boat in Panama City Beach, Fla.

”The boat was large enough to hold 25-30 people, and we never lost sight of land. But I was sick from the time they cranked the engine until I put my feet on the ground back at the harbor when the trip was over.

”There's no sickness like seasickness.

”Being seasick means trying to hold onto the boat so that you don't fall overboard while vomiting violently over the side. It means your buddies will try to fish facing away from you so their stomachs aren't turned by the sight of you upchucking.”

CommercialAppeal.com


18 July 2012

• Global Coral Bleaching Prediction and Monitoring Get Major Upgrades



”NOAA announced today a major advance in the ability to predict mass coral bleaching - providing the probability of bleaching up to four months into the future - with a newly developed global seasonal outlook system.”

NOAA


• Warm Waters Attracting Unusual Species



”In addition to the drum, Ardolino and his fares last week were treated to the sight of big cobia jumping on the surface, and the sight of whales and porpoise in our waters has been commonplace this year.

”West End anglers have reported catching silvery smooth puffers.”

Newsday.com


17 July 2012

• Connecticut Fishing Report – 12 July 2012



DEEP seems a little slow getting these reports posted.


Striped Bass: Fishing remains good especially from dusk to dawn. Live lining bunker on three-way rigs have been very effective. Just remember to use circle hooks to reduce “gut hooking”. Striper spots include the Watch Hill reefs, lower Thames River, the Race, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, Little Gull Island, outer Bartlett Reef, Black Point, Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River, Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef (outer), Six Mile Reef, the reefs off Branford, Falkner Island area, New Haven Harbor (including Sandy Point), and the Charles Island area.

Also Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Bridgeport Harbor, Penfield Reef, around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef. Also, don’t forget about our coastal state parks for shore fishing access.
Bluefish: Fishing is good throughout LIS. The Race and Plum Gut have been consistent spots.
Snapper Bluefish: Fishing is good to excellent in the tidal rivers and creeks. Snappers are about 3 to 4 inches long. Flood tide is best.
Fluke: Fishing is fair to good. Fishing locations include south side of Port Jefferson, Fishers Island (Isabella Beach, Wilderness Point), off the Stonington breakwater, mouth of the Mystic River to Groton Long Point, Thames River channel, Black Point/Niantic Bay, Long Sand Shoal, Westbrook-Clinton area, Falkner Island area, New Haven Harbor to West Haven, and off the mouth off the Housatonic River.
Porgy: Fishing is good to excellent on the major reefs/rock piles.
Black Sea Bass: Fishing is good on the reefs/wrecks. Fishing around slack tide is best.
Hickory Shad: Fishing is good to excellent in the lower Connecticut River by the DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier. Flood tide is best.
Blue Crabbing: Remains good in the tidal creeks of Stonington to Mystic and Westbrook to Guilford.
Special Note: During the summer months, anglers may accidentally hook up with a sandbar shark or a sand tiger shark. Sandbar and sand tiger sharks are protected and must be released unharmed. Simply cut the leader if you encounter one. Do not attempt to bring these sharks onboard!

CTDEEP


• Bummer…There’s No Such Thing As A Mermaid!



”As far as scientists are concerned, there is no scientific proof of mermaids yet, the United States' oceanic body insisted this week.

"“The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) stressed this about a month after a science TV show featuring mermaids was aired.”

GManAtWork.com