16 September 2009

Rx…Wherein Lies a Tale

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I’ve been sick with some darned bug for eight days now. [Explains the lack of fishing reports on this blog.] Yesterday, gave up and went to the doc who poked, prodded, asked questions about symptoms, and decided I needed to take an antibiotic in case my cough and red-looking inner ear were signs of a bacterial infection. Left the doc’s office after 5 minutes of doctor-contact and 55 minutes of dealing with insurance and HIPAA forms.

Traipsed off to the drug store I’ve been using for the past 10 years. Clerk told me “fifteen minutes.” Thirty-five minutes later, I had the prescription. Took it home. Was about to pop one of the pills when I decided to review the three pages of boilerplate the druggist furnished with the Rx.

If you’ve ever looked at the paperwork that accompanies many prescriptions, you know there’s a section headed, DO NOT USE THIS MEDICINE IF YOU ARE ALSO TAKING: For this Rx the list of possible bad interactions included a drug I’ll call “TickerRhythm” as that’s what it does…it keeps heart rhythms under control.

Guess who has been taking TickerRhythm for the past X years. Right. Me.

So I call the doc’s office and say “WTH?” [What the heck.] Lady has to get a note to the doc. Doc calls me back and admits he blew it but says he’s surprised that the drug store computer didn’t catch the conflict. He calls the drug store to order a different Rx for me.

The druggist calls me to apologize, but says the computer blew it. Doesn’t understand why the computer didn’t pick up the interaction as all my Rx records are on the computer.

In other words, if I had died from taking that Rx, the family would have had to sue a computer for malpractice.

Moral of the tale: READ THE PAPERWORK THAT COMES WITH YOUR Rx!

Ps.: Heart doc recently decided I had high blood pressure. I disagreed, but he insisted and put me on a BP controller. Within days I was becoming disoriented while working at the desk and, taking my own BP, getting readings like 90/50. We cut the quantity of the BP controller in half. Symptoms persisted…BP was still way too low. Cut it to the smallest amount available in a prescription. Was falling off my work chair. Stopped taking the Rx…and am now fine.

Pps.: Another time the doc wanted to put me on a different heart-rhythm controller. Picked up the pills and upon reading the accompanying literature learned that one of the potential side effects is that it can turn your skin blue. And, even if you stop taking it, your skin will stay blue…forever. Haven’t taken a single one of those turkeys.

Ppps.: Ms. Caryl and I are off to New Hampshire and Maine over the next several days. Hope to fish Portsmouth Harbor environs with Capt. Peter Whelan, and then do some surfcasting at the mouth of the mighty Spurwink River.

Lobstahs, here we come!

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Don’t forget, a saltwater fishing license is now required to fish the marine waters of Connecticut. You can purchase one from your local bait & tackle shop, such as Newtown Bait & Tackle, or at Town/City Hall.

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Check these links for more information:

Connecticut Tourism;
Long Island Sound Resource Center;
Housatonic Valley Association;
Stratford, Connecticut;
Milford, Connecticut

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